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2017 Offseason thread 2: Shanny and Lynch
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Forge


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

big9erfan wrote:
FWIW I was able to get a more representative example than just last year's 6 games. Turns out that in 2015 and 2016 combined Kap started 19 games in which he threw 575 passes, Hoyer started 14 games in which he threw 569 passes. That's a much better sample, and coincidentally just about the same number of passes so no "extending for ... " is necessary.

Completion %: Kap - 59.1%, Hoyer - 62.9
YPA: Kap - 6.7. Hoyer - 7.1
Passing Yards: Kap - 3856, Hoyer - 4051
Passing Yards per Game: Kap - 184 , Hoyer - 238
TD/Int Ratio: Kap - 22/9 (2.4), Hoyer - 25/7b (3.6)
QB Rating: Kap - 85. Hoyer - 94
Sacks: Kap - 64, Hoyer - 29
Sack Yardage: Kap - 373, Hoyer - 203

So there you go. Over all of 2015 and 2016 they each managed to get in about one season's worth of play and all the number still favor Hoyer, not as dramatically, but still it's all of them not a "cherry picked" one. Prior to 2015? I don't care. To reiterate - I'm not a fan of Hoyer and don't expect much. I just think he'll be better than Kap, and I think his performance over the past two years gives me hope that maybe that will prove to be the case. Kap was a bottom third of starting QBs, and IMHO not overly close to making it into the middle third. I think Hoyer in this system could approach making it into the bottom of the second third. Either way, not worth arguing about. He's our place holder till we get our franchise QB.


This is true. It also happens to contain the worst 6 game stretch of Kaep's career where he was very hurt and the best 5 game stretch of Hoyers, but yeah, Hoyer slightly better, I'll grant you. There are no excuses for that - he just was, Kaep's injury or lack of offensive talent not withstanding.

The 14 games prior to that for Hoyer weren't all that great and he had Shanny as his OC. It also leaves out the debacle of that Houston playoff game that is right in the middle of that run over the past two seasons. They are pretty comparable even still, and again, they leave out the running of Kaep, which is a vital component of his game even if you don't want to count it. You can say you don't care about it, but that's like saying you're not going to give Laveon Bell or David Johnson credit for what they are going to do in the receiving game.

I'm not saying that Hoyer won't be better. I'm not saying that we should have kept Kaep. I think it's better to start fresh and I think Hoyer is excellent for this. I think he may get the system better, and he's probably a better fit for this scheme overall (though Shanny has already proven he will adapt to whatever he has). And I don't think that either of us think Hoyer is the answer...I just don't necessarily agree that this is an immediate upgrade on the field. Saying so either drastically underrates Kaep, or overrates Hoyer. I'm just not ready to claim that we are somehow upgrading by going from Kaep to Hoyer. It's too early to know that. If you want to say one is trending upward while the other is trendign downward, I agree. Maybe we are catching a late bloomer in Hoyer. I won't discount that, just like Rudy said. But I need to see more of that quite frankly. I'm not ready to praise anyone, or drop anyone, after basically a year. I wouldn't crown OBJ king of receivers after his rookie year either. I didn't list josh gordon in my top 5 receivers after his monster year. I just want a longer track record. Right now, I consider the overall track record of these two to be very comparable, with Kaep having a slight edge on the career, but with an emphasis on days I think have long since passed, while Hoyer has put his best play on display more recently.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

big9erfan wrote:

And you and I will never agree on the value of Kap's running. To you it's a very positive thing. To me is quite distinctly, and TO ME quite evidently, a negative. There are lots of guys on teams that can run the ball, but only one that can pass it. Kap's running often represent yards that others could have gotten running especially if we had a better passing game so that defenses had to play us honestly instead of loading up the box with little fear of anything other than Kap running like a mad chicken around the end for a gain. In the end it represent a failure of our passing game and his running in no way makes up for that failure. No team can be successful with an inadequate passing attack. It is not coincidence that there is clear inverse realtationship between guys considered the best QBs in the game and the best runners in the game.


It's not so much that it's a positive thing...but when you have two guys who throw the football about the same, I think it has to count for something as at least he's getting something. If Hoyer misses that guy 40 yards down the field, you may get nothing. And there isn't anything in their career that would really suggest that Hoyer does find that guy more often than Kaepernick.

But I get this. ABsolutely. We are actually in agreement on this - I would much rather Kaep have been a better passer and not run as much. A more tarditional pocket passer I can trust to win the game with his arm. He just wasn't that, and his legs could still be effective. I mean, in the end, I get where the negativity is coming from. What good is a 10 yard scramble when you couldn't go through your progressions and missed a 40 yard pass? I am with you on that. But it's not like Hoyer is finding that guy all of the time either. So maybe he just throws an incomplete pass while Kaep brakes loose and grabs 18 on a run. And we don't know the percentages on that. It's kind of hard to explain - but it's like we automatically assume that when Kaepernick breaks loose on a play where he misses an open receiver that any other "true" pocket quarterback would have seen it. And that's just not true. For all we know, 80% of the time that happens with Kaep, if Hoyer was in his shoes it could have been an incomplete pass, a sack, a 5 yard checkdown, or an interception. It's just something that's impossible to know. It also could be a touchdown. Who knows? But Kaep is at least getting something, so I have to account for that in some way, especially when the two being compared are pretty similar as passers over their career.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
but you can't cherry pick stats

...

4:1 td to picks? That's strong. Only 4 picks total?


Of course those 4 ints yielded an int rate that was by far the lowest of his career, in fact an abberation compared to the rest of his career. And they happen to be the one and only good passing stat he had. Ints is a stat that by its nature is always a small sample size. To raise his completion percentage a few points he'd have to complete a lot more passes. But just two more ints would increase his interception rate by 50%. Aside from that one stat, and its positive impact on his quarterback rating, all the rest of his stats were indeed pretty awful compared to other qbs. There's just no objective way to to argue he had a pretty good year. If you want to compare him to guys that didn't play or shouldn't have been playing then he was passable. As a starter he was one of the worst starting QBs in the league.



Matt Barkley begs to differ! Wink

There's a perfectly understandable reason why Kap throws few INTs. He doesn't throw a very catchable ball. That counts for offense AND defense. Wink
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
they leave out the running of Kaep, which is a vital component of his game even if you don't want to count it. You can say you don't care about it, but that's like saying you're not going to give Laveon Bell or David Johnson credit for what they are going to do in the receiving game.



I think that's a bad example, because a RB catching the ball isn't his decision. You can't leave that out of his evaluation, because no matter how he got the ball, it's still running with the ball, and the way he got the ball is someone else's decision. In Kap's case, running can come at the detriment of the passing game. It's decision making, and it's the very thing we question about Kap, whether he can process the game well enough.

He had success when he came in in 2012, because Harbaugh and Roman dumbed down the playbook, the same playbook they had gradually expanded with Alex as the QB. All of a sudden, we had a more explosive QB, but the offense became simpler, which caught up to Kap. In 2013, they tried to expand it, and had to revert back to simpler things. Earlier this year, Blaine was incompetent that we can't tell whether Chip had to simplify anything for Kap (although, no one has ever claimed Chip's offense to be sophisticated). Kap has a history of slowly processing offenses, and now we're bringing in a much more sophisticated offense with Kylo. Even if Kap and Hoyer were equal, Kap simply might not be able to run the offense at all. Even if Kap was actually significantly better than Hoyer, he might still not be able to run it at all. Hoyer might not run it at a high level. Maybe we'll get the Shanahan version of Hoyer's stats, and not the last two years' version. But if we can at least run with the full playbook, and not a dumbed down version, it will at least benefit everyone else, even if we're not getting a high octane offense.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rudyZ wrote:
Forge wrote:
they leave out the running of Kaep, which is a vital component of his game even if you don't want to count it. You can say you don't care about it, but that's like saying you're not going to give Laveon Bell or David Johnson credit for what they are going to do in the receiving game.



I think that's a bad example, because a RB catching the ball isn't his decision. You can't leave that out of his evaluation, because no matter how he got the ball, it's still running with the ball, and the way he got the ball is someone else's decision. In Kap's case, running can come at the detriment of the passing game. It's decision making, and it's the very thing we question about Kap, whether he can process the game well enough.


It can be, but is not always. That's part of the problem...everyone just makes it seem like every time he runs with the football it's the wrong decision. That's not the case. It's a mixed bag. I also don't get why a quarterback who makes the wrong decision throwing the football, resulting in a incompletion is better than the "wrong decision" of deciding to tuck and run. Again, Hoyer's passing history really doesn't support that he is superior in passing the football than Kaep has been over his career. So we have two comparable guys throwing the football, but one gets you an extra 400-500 yards rushing...how is that not advantageous? I could understand this if we were comparing Kaepernick to Matt Ryan...completely different beast. But it's not. It's Brian Hoyer.

I would think that Hoyer's decision making throughout his career is just as questionable as Kaeps. There's a reason that Hoyer is now on his sixth team in a 9 year career. Again, not saying that Hoyer isn't actually better as a passing quarterback - but they are comparable enough to where Kaep's legs should still come in to play.

Quote:
He had success when he came in in 2012, because Harbaugh and Roman dumbed down the playbook, the same playbook they had gradually expanded with Alex as the QB. All of a sudden, we had a more explosive QB, but the offense became simpler, which caught up to Kap. In 2013, they tried to expand it, and had to revert back to simpler things. Earlier this year, Blaine was incompetent that we can't tell whether Chip had to simplify anything for Kap (although, no one has ever claimed Chip's offense to be sophisticated). Kap has a history of slowly processing offenses, and now we're bringing in a much more sophisticated offense with Kylo. Even if Kap and Hoyer were equal, Kap simply might not be able to run the offense at all. Even if Kap was actually significantly better than Hoyer, he might still not be able to run it at all. Hoyer might not run it at a high level. Maybe we'll get the Shanahan version of Hoyer's stats, and not the last two years' version. But if we can at least run with the full playbook, and not a dumbed down version, it will at least benefit everyone else, even if we're not getting a high octane offense.


Well, the playbook stuff is completely irrelevant to the discussion - its about whether or not we have upgraded on the field. If we are using a dumbed down playbook, but are wildly successful, what does it matter? Shanny has already shown that he will adjust his offense to match his quarterback - he did it with RG3 and got the best out of him and a very productive offense. If Hoyer isn't running this offense at a higher level, what do I care that we get to run shanny's full offense as its truly to be run?

The crux of the conversation is whether or not we are better on the field with Hoyer rather than Kaepernick. Nothing more, nothing less. I don't know that there's anything that supports that we are. Doesn't mean we won't be, but it is certainly too early too tell.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
big9erfan wrote:

And you and I will never agree on the value of Kap's running. To you it's a very positive thing. To me is quite distinctly, and TO ME quite evidently, a negative. There are lots of guys on teams that can run the ball, but only one that can pass it. Kap's running often represent yards that others could have gotten running especially if we had a better passing game so that defenses had to play us honestly instead of loading up the box with little fear of anything other than Kap running like a mad chicken around the end for a gain. In the end it represent a failure of our passing game and his running in no way makes up for that failure. No team can be successful with an inadequate passing attack. It is not coincidence that there is clear inverse realtationship between guys considered the best QBs in the game and the best runners in the game.


It's not so much that it's a positive thing...but when you have two guys who throw the football about the same, I think it has to count for something as at least he's getting something. If Hoyer misses that guy 40 yards down the field, you may get nothing. And there isn't anything in their career that would really suggest that Hoyer does find that guy more often than Kaepernick.

But I get this. ABsolutely. We are actually in agreement on this - I would much rather Kaep have been a better passer and not run as much. A more tarditional pocket passer I can trust to win the game with his arm. He just wasn't that, and his legs could still be effective. I mean, in the end, I get where the negativity is coming from. What good is a 10 yard scramble when you couldn't go through your progressions and missed a 40 yard pass? I am with you on that. But it's not like Hoyer is finding that guy all of the time either. So maybe he just throws an incomplete pass while Kaep brakes loose and grabs 18 on a run. And we don't know the percentages on that. It's kind of hard to explain - but it's like we automatically assume that when Kaepernick breaks loose on a play where he misses an open receiver that any other "true" pocket quarterback would have seen it. And that's just not true. For all we know, 80% of the time that happens with Kaep, if Hoyer was in his shoes it could have been an incomplete pass, a sack, a 5 yard checkdown, or an interception. It's just something that's impossible to know. It also could be a touchdown. Who knows? But Kaep is at least getting something, so I have to account for that in some way, especially when the two being compared are pretty similar as passers over their career.


Great. And I'll certainly conceded I'd rather have a QB with the ability to scramble out of the pocket and get something out of nothing than have a statue back there.

I really do think though that Kap suffered during the development of his career by just being physically way more gifted than the other guys he played with. He could leave the pocket and outrun guys and even outmuscle them early on. I think he came to depend on this ability at the expense of developing his passing talents to their fullest. I mean he has an arm that's hard to beat. But he just too often relies on his legs when there are passing yards to be had. It might seem like a fair trade - either he gets 10 to 20 yards passing, or 10 to 20 running. But the latter makes it way easier to play defense. It's easy to see that nice run he made but much harder to see that the RB running into the middle of the line repeatedly for no gain is in part due to the fact that the defense doesn't need to worry about our passing game.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rudyZ wrote:
big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
but you can't cherry pick stats

...

4:1 td to picks? That's strong. Only 4 picks total?


Of course those 4 ints yielded an int rate that was by far the lowest of his career, in fact an abberation compared to the rest of his career. And they happen to be the one and only good passing stat he had. Ints is a stat that by its nature is always a small sample size. To raise his completion percentage a few points he'd have to complete a lot more passes. But just two more ints would increase his interception rate by 50%. Aside from that one stat, and its positive impact on his quarterback rating, all the rest of his stats were indeed pretty awful compared to other qbs. There's just no objective way to to argue he had a pretty good year. If you want to compare him to guys that didn't play or shouldn't have been playing then he was passable. As a starter he was one of the worst starting QBs in the league.



Matt Barkley begs to differ! Wink

There's a perfectly understandable reason why Kap throws few INTs. He doesn't throw a very catchable ball. That counts for offense AND defense. Wink
Very Happy
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
I also don't get why a quarterback who makes the wrong decision throwing the football, resulting in a incompletion is better than the "wrong decision" of deciding to tuck and run.


I tried to answer this in my last post. It's the same reason why I said that when we had Ginn here we needed to throw two or three deep passes in his direction every game. Even if they went incomplete if forces the defense to play honestly and respect, at least to some extent, the passing game. When a QB sees a phantom pass rush, and IMHO Kap was about as bad at that as any QB I've watched, and hauls the ball down and runs with it the impact is not solely what happens on that one play. It's the impact on the overall offensive strategy and how it allows the defense to play. Take effective passing out of a team's arsenal and their running game becomes an awful lot harder to work successfully.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
I also don't get why a quarterback who makes the wrong decision throwing the football, resulting in a incompletion is better than the "wrong decision" of deciding to tuck and run.


I tried to answer this in my last post. It's the same reason why I said that when we had Ginn here we needed to throw two or three deep passes in his direction every game. Even if they went incomplete if forces the defense to play honestly and respect, at least to some extent, the passing game. When a QB sees a phantom pass rush, and IMHO Kap was about as bad at that as any QB I've watched, and hauls the ball down and runs with it the impact is not solely what happens on that one play. It's the impact on the overall offensive strategy and how it allows the defense to play. Take effective passing out of a team's arsenal and their running game becomes an awful lot harder to work successfully.


But there's a secondary reaction to that - if the teams have to fear the run, that means that they may have to adjust to it as well. Maybe they have a spy on the quarterback, which means one less pass rusher or one less guy in coverage that may open up passing lanes later on. I mean, the running just cuts both ways. It can be positive, can be negative. I don't mind acknowledging both, but I think you have to acknowledge both. I get the desire for more of a pocket passer - I don't even mind it or necessarily disagree with it.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

big9erfan wrote:
rudyZ wrote:
big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
but you can't cherry pick stats

...

4:1 td to picks? That's strong. Only 4 picks total?


Of course those 4 ints yielded an int rate that was by far the lowest of his career, in fact an abberation compared to the rest of his career. And they happen to be the one and only good passing stat he had. Ints is a stat that by its nature is always a small sample size. To raise his completion percentage a few points he'd have to complete a lot more passes. But just two more ints would increase his interception rate by 50%. Aside from that one stat, and its positive impact on his quarterback rating, all the rest of his stats were indeed pretty awful compared to other qbs. There's just no objective way to to argue he had a pretty good year. If you want to compare him to guys that didn't play or shouldn't have been playing then he was passable. As a starter he was one of the worst starting QBs in the league.



Matt Barkley begs to differ! Wink

There's a perfectly understandable reason why Kap throws few INTs. He doesn't throw a very catchable ball. That counts for offense AND defense. Wink
Very Happy


I somehow missed that comment about kaep throwing a catchable ball...thats funny. well played, rudy Laughing
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
I also don't get why a quarterback who makes the wrong decision throwing the football, resulting in a incompletion is better than the "wrong decision" of deciding to tuck and run.


I tried to answer this in my last post. It's the same reason why I said that when we had Ginn here we needed to throw two or three deep passes in his direction every game. Even if they went incomplete if forces the defense to play honestly and respect, at least to some extent, the passing game. When a QB sees a phantom pass rush, and IMHO Kap was about as bad at that as any QB I've watched, and hauls the ball down and runs with it the impact is not solely what happens on that one play. It's the impact on the overall offensive strategy and how it allows the defense to play. Take effective passing out of a team's arsenal and their running game becomes an awful lot harder to work successfully.


But there's a secondary reaction to that - if the teams have to fear the run, that means that they may have to adjust to it as well. Maybe they have a spy on the quarterback, which means one less pass rusher or one less guy in coverage that may open up passing lanes later on. I mean, the running just cuts both ways. It can be positive, can be negative. I don't mind acknowledging both, but I think you have to acknowledge both. I get the desire for more of a pocket passer - I don't even mind it or necessarily disagree with it.



So, if Kap gained an advantage in the passing game from his ability to run, why didn't he take advantage of it? Or if he did, it just means that he was even worse overall at reading a defense. What happens if he injures a knee and can't run anymore?

Personally, I want an athletic QB who can run. I don't want an athletic QB who wants to run. Aaron Rodgers takes what the defense gives him, and it obviously doesn't deter from his ability to pass the ball. I think Kap will resort to running way too early in the decision making process, because running is something he's comfortable doing, it's something he wants to do. It's his decision process. And that's the reason why I think he's a limited QB.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rudyZ wrote:


So, if Kap gained an advantage in the passing game from his ability to run, why didn't he take advantage of it? Or if he did, it just means that he was even worse overall at reading a defense. What happens if he injures a knee and can't run anymore?


Again, what does it matter if the offense is just as effective, if not more so? It seems like to me that the hate comes from him just not playing a style that everyone wants him to play. If he was taking advantage of it, yes, that means he may be he's not naturally as gifted throwing the football, but it doesn't matter because his overall skillset yields the results of what Hoyer gets...and that's without adding in what he is adding on the ground.

What happens if Hoyer tears a rotator cuff? That's just a silly argument - any quarterback can get hurt at any point in time. Kaep hasn't injured his knee yet, so this is completely irrelevant. If or when he does, then that will change the eval. But it hasn't, and you can't just expect it or use that to your advantage in an argumrent

Quote:
Personally, I want an athletic QB who can run. I don't want an athletic QB who wants to run. Aaron Rodgers takes what the defense gives him, and it obviously doesn't deter from his ability to pass the ball. I think Kap will resort to running way too early in the decision making process, because running is something he's comfortable doing, it's something he wants to do. It's his decision process. And that's the reason why I think he's a limited QB.


Don't disagree with that, but you take what you can get. Both of these quarterbacks are limited in what they do as passers...it's not like Hoyer isn't just as limited in Kaepernick.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
big9erfan wrote:
Forge wrote:
I also don't get why a quarterback who makes the wrong decision throwing the football, resulting in a incompletion is better than the "wrong decision" of deciding to tuck and run.


I tried to answer this in my last post. It's the same reason why I said that when we had Ginn here we needed to throw two or three deep passes in his direction every game. Even if they went incomplete if forces the defense to play honestly and respect, at least to some extent, the passing game. When a QB sees a phantom pass rush, and IMHO Kap was about as bad at that as any QB I've watched, and hauls the ball down and runs with it the impact is not solely what happens on that one play. It's the impact on the overall offensive strategy and how it allows the defense to play. Take effective passing out of a team's arsenal and their running game becomes an awful lot harder to work successfully.


But there's a secondary reaction to that - if the teams have to fear the run, that means that they may have to adjust to it as well. Maybe they have a spy on the quarterback, which means one less pass rusher or one less guy in coverage that may open up passing lanes later on. I mean, the running just cuts both ways. It can be positive, can be negative. I don't mind acknowledging both, but I think you have to acknowledge both. I get the desire for more of a pocket passer - I don't even mind it or necessarily disagree with it.


And I don't mind a QB like Wilson or ROdgers who I think run when they needs to,not when someone is anywhere near him, and who still tries to pass rather than run when someone is open. There's no doubt that the ability to run is an asset. The tendency to run to soon is a negative in my mind. Ok. Enough from me on a QB that is no longer with us. How about that Alex Smith!
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forge wrote:
rudyZ wrote:


So, if Kap gained an advantage in the passing game from his ability to run, why didn't he take advantage of it? Or if he did, it just means that he was even worse overall at reading a defense. What happens if he injures a knee and can't run anymore?


Again, what does it matter if the offense is just as effective, if not more so? It seems like to me that the hate comes from him just not playing a style that everyone wants him to play. If he was taking advantage of it, yes, that means he may be he's not naturally as gifted throwing the football, but it doesn't matter because his overall skillset yields the results of what Hoyer gets...and that's without adding in what he is adding on the ground.

What happens if Hoyer tears a rotator cuff? That's just a silly argument - any quarterback can get hurt at any point in time. Kaep hasn't injured his knee yet, so this is completely irrelevant. If or when he does, then that will change the eval. But it hasn't, and you can't just expect it or use that to your advantage in an argumrent

Quote:
Personally, I want an athletic QB who can run. I don't want an athletic QB who wants to run. Aaron Rodgers takes what the defense gives him, and it obviously doesn't deter from his ability to pass the ball. I think Kap will resort to running way too early in the decision making process, because running is something he's comfortable doing, it's something he wants to do. It's his decision process. And that's the reason why I think he's a limited QB.


Don't disagree with that, but you take what you can get. Both of these quarterbacks are limited in what they do as passers...it's not like Hoyer isn't just as limited in Kaepernick.



The rotator cuff example has nothing to do with it. Every QB cannot succeed without his throwing shoulder. But plenty of QBs will still be able to play even with reduced mobility, with reduced speed and a heavy brace on their knee. With Kap, you'd lose most of what makes him somewhat acceptable. Hoyer, who is not athletic to begin with, wouldn't see much of a difference. Defenses wouldn't stop fearing his running to focus more on his passing. If Kap had been a more accomplished passer, then yes, his running would have been a valuable weapon. He'd force opponents to play complex coverage, and then he could take advantage of that attention to gain yards with his legs. It shouldn't be the other way around, where his legs get the attention in order to soften the coverage. That's the way college football works. The NFL is far less forgiving.
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2017 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess I'll post this here but the great Dwight Clark just announced that he has ALS.

http://debartoloholdings.com/dwightclark.html
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