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Aaron Rodgers loses 11 pounds doing yoga.
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squire12


Joined: 15 Mar 2013
Posts: 2415
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22522590

Quote:
Br J Sports Med. 2012 Sep;46(12):838-45. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2011-090835. Epub 2012 Apr 20.
The effects of eccentric training on lower limb flexibility: a systematic review.
O'Sullivan K1, McAuliffe S, Deburca N.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Reduced flexibility has been documented in athletes with lower limb injury, however, stretching has limited evidence of effectiveness in preventing injury or reducing the risk of recurrence. In contrast, it has been proposed that eccentric training can improve strength and reduce the risk of injury, and facilitate increased muscle flexibility via sarcomerogenesis.
OBJECTIVES:
This systematic review was undertaken to examine the evidence that eccentric training has demonstrated effectiveness as a means of improving lower limb flexibility.
STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS:
Six electronic databases were systematically searched by two independent reviewers to identify randomised clinical trials comparing the effectiveness of eccentric training to either a different intervention, or a no-intervention control group. Studies evaluating flexibility using both joint range of motion (ROM) and muscle fascicle length (FL) were included. Six studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, and were appraised using the PEDro scale. Differences in the muscles studied, and the outcome measures used, did not allow for pooled analysis.
RESULTS:
There was consistent, strong evidence from all six trials in three different muscle groups that eccentric training can improve lower limb flexibility, as assessed using either joint ROM or muscle FL.
CONCLUSION:
The results support the hypothesis that eccentric training is an effective method of increasing lower limb flexibility. Further research is required to compare the increased flexibility obtained after eccentric training to that obtained with static stretching and other exercise interventions.
PMID: 22522590 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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squire12


Joined: 15 Mar 2013
Posts: 2415
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

More information for those looking at the effects of static stretching on muscle performance power output.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17194246

Quote:
J Strength Cond Res. 2006 Nov;20(4):804-10.
Acute effect of static stretching on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension.
Yamaguchi T1, Ishii K, Yamanaka M, Yasuda K.
Author information
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of static stretching on muscular performance during concentric isotonic (dynamic constant external resistance [DCER]) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were assessed in 12 healthy male subjects after 2 types of pretreatment. The pretreatments included (a) static stretching treatment performing 6 types of static stretching on leg extensors (4 sets of 30 seconds each with 20-second rest periods; total duration 20 minutes) and (b) nonstretching treatment by resting for 20 minutes in a sitting position. Loads during assessment of the power output were set to 5, 30, and 60% of the maximum voluntary contractile (MVC) torque with isometric leg extension in each subject. The peak power output following the static stretching treatment was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that following the nonstretching treatment under each load (5% MVC, 418.0 +/- 82.2 W vs. 466.2 +/- 89.5 W; 30% MVC, 506.4 +/- 82.8 W vs. 536.4 +/- 97.0 W; 60% MVC, 478.6 +/- 77.5 W vs. 523.8 +/- 97.8 W). The present study demonstrated that relatively extensive static stretching significantly reduces power output with concentric DCER muscle actions under various loads. Common power activities are carried out by DCER muscle actions under various loads. Therefore, the result of the present study suggests that relatively extensive static stretching decreases power performance.
PMID: 17194246 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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blankman0021


Joined: 02 May 2007
Posts: 1923
Location: MKE
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Without quoting specific parts...


It very much depends what they were testing in that study. And what they had the athletes do.

Like I said- speaking from experience... Without proper training and conditioning... Which includes dynamic stretching, strength work (focusing on the proper form) and cooling down properly- you have a significant increase in injuries.

If you've played a sport collegiately or professionally you probably know it's the little things that really help the most. Everybody at the nfl level is putting in their mandated time in the weight room and the practice field. It's the guys in the film room, doing core exercises, and adding extra flexibility through things like yoga that have the potential to really up their game.

Try running 50+ miles per week. Don't stretch afterwards. And tell me what happens. I bet 9 athletes out of 10 will end up tweaking a muscle... Specifically a hamstring... Because flexibility is just as important as overall strength.

I'm not discounting the study you brought up- but without knowing exactly how they were testing it- it's hard to know why they received the results they got. Plus- based off the final bolded statement- they seemed to be testing the benefits of static stretching before workouts. It's been pretty common knowledge that dynamic stretching before workouts helps, and then static stretching after workouts works.
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deathstar


Joined: 06 Jun 2012
Posts: 725
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I understand that stretching is a significant part of yoga. It however is not the only part and, in my experience, not the main focus. It's putting your body in awkward positions that it's not accustomed to and building strength to maintain postures. I have a weak ankle and yoga is great for building strength there.

It's similar to working on a balance ball - which is a part of the Packers' training.

squire - your studies are interesting. They provide evidence that stretching doesn't reduce the incidence of injury. I wonder, though, if they have a point beyond that? Do they at all state that yoga reduces the incidence of injury?
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squire12


Joined: 15 Mar 2013
Posts: 2415
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

blankman0021 wrote:


Try running 50+ miles per week. Don't stretch afterwards. And tell me what happens. I bet 9 athletes out of 10 will end up tweaking a muscle... Specifically a hamstring... Because flexibility is just as important as overall strength.

.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16130528

Quote:
Rev Med Suisse. 2005 Jul 27;1(2Cool:1830-4.
[Is stretching for sports performance still useful? A review of the literature].
[Article in French]
Gremion G.
Author information
Abstract
Since 1980, according to several authors, it is accepted that increasing flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit allows a better performance and decreases sports injuries. Stretching is regularly included in warm-up and in cooling-down. However, there are contradictory findings in the literature. In contrast, since 1990, there's evidence suggesting that stretching not only does not prevent injuries, but can also decrease the level of performance. Some part of these contradictions can be explained by the various sports activities. Those requesting an increased flexibility, such as gymnastic, dancing or diving, necessitate pre-exercise stretching to optimize the level of performance. In contrary, for sports with slow stretch-shortening cycle such as jogging or cycling, there is no scientific data showing a positive effect of stretching.
PMID: 16130528 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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I understand your personal feelings on the matter, but the literature and research does not support your viewpoint.
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Frank-O


Joined: 20 Jun 2012
Posts: 1212
Location: Wisconsin - Cheeseland
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man GTFO with your 'google research expertise', if you don't think stretching can help prevent muscle/ligament injuries you're a fool.
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squire12


Joined: 15 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21825112

Quote:
Am J Sports Med. 2011 Nov;39(11):2296-303. doi: 10.1177/0363546511419277. Epub 2011 Aug 8.
Preventive effect of eccentric training on acute hamstring injuries in men's soccer: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.
Petersen J1, Thorborg K, Nielsen MB, Budtz-Jørgensen E, Hölmich P.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
The incidence of acute hamstring injuries is high in several sports, including the different forms of football.
PURPOSE:
The authors investigated the preventive effect of eccentric strengthening of the hamstring muscles using the Nordic hamstring exercise compared with no additional hamstring exercise on the rate of acute hamstring injuries in male soccer players.
STUDY DESIGN:
Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.
METHODS:
Fifty Danish male professional and amateur soccer teams (942 players) were allocated to an intervention group (461 players) or a control group (481 players). Players in the intervention group conducted a 10-week progressive eccentric training program followed by a weekly seasonal program, whereas players in the control group followed their usual training program. The main outcome measures were numbers of overall, new, and recurrent acute hamstring injuries during 1 full soccer season.
RESULTS:
Fifty-two acute hamstring injuries in the control group compared with 15 injuries in the intervention group were registered. Comparing intervention versus the control group, overall acute hamstring injury rates per 100 player seasons were 3.8 versus 13.1 (adjusted rate ratio [RR], 0.293; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.150-0.572; P < .001). New injury rates per 100 player seasons were 3.1 versus 8.1 (RR, 0.410; 95% CI, 0.180-0.933; P = .034), whereas recurrent injury rates per 100 player seasons were 7.1 versus 45.8 (RR, 0.137; 95% CI, 0.037-0.509; P = .003). Number needed to treat [NNT] to prevent 1 acute hamstring injury (new or recurrent) is 13 (95% CI, 9-23) players. The NNT to prevent 1 new injury is 25 (95% CI, 15-72) players, and NNT to prevent 1 recurrent injury is 3 (95% CI, 2-6) players.
CONCLUSION:
IN male professional and amateur soccer players, additional eccentric hamstring exercise decreased the rate of overall, new, and recurrent acute hamstring injuries.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23269328

Quote:
Clin J Sport Med. 2013 Jan;23(1):85-6. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0b013e31827e9f40.
Does eccentric training of hamstring muscles reduce acute injuries in soccer?
Nichols AW.
Author information
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the effectiveness of a 10-week hamstring exercise training program in reducing the incidence and severity of new and recurrent hamstring injuries among male soccer players.
DESIGN:
Cluster-randomized (by team)controlled trial, stratified by level of play and geographic location. Sample size was calculated with 80% power to show a relative risk reduction for injury of 50% at P ≤ 0.05.
SETTING:
Soccer community study in Denmark during the period January to December 2008.
PARTICIPANTS:
Teams in the top 5 soccer divisions (2 professional and 3 amateur)were invited to participate. The exclusion criterion for teams was that they already used eccentric hamstring exercises, and for participants was that they joined the teams after the beginning of the season. Of 116 teams, 54 were eligible and willing to be randomized and 50 were included in the analysis (942 players).
INTERVENTION:
Teams in both the intervention and control groups followed their normal training programs. At the beginning of the study period, the intervention teams added 27 sessions of the Nordicham string exercise (after warm-up) during the 10-week period of the mid-season break. The exercise begins with the player kneeling with the torso upright and rigid, and the feet held down to the ground by a partner. The player lowers his torso forwards toward the ground braking with his hamstring muscles until the chest reaches the ground (eccentric phase). He returns to the upright position, pushing with his hands to minimize the concentric phase load. Sessions per week and sets and repetitions per session increased to 3, 3, and 12, respectively. Team coaches supervised the sessions.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
A hamstring injury was defined as an acute occurrence of a “physical complaint in the region of the posterior thigh sustained during a soccer match or training, irrespective of the need for medical attention or time loss from soccer activities.” Injuries were recorded by the teams’ medical staff on standardized forms. Only first injuries during the season were included and recorded as first-time injuries or recurrences of injuries sustained before the season.Severity of injury was defined by number of days lost from full participation in games and practices.
MAIN RESULTS:
Injury rates per 100 player sessions were lower for the intervention group (3.Cool than for the control group(13.1); thus, the rate ratio (RR) adjusted for age, level of competition, and previous injury was 0.293 (95% confidence interval[CI], 0.150-0.572). Both rates of new and recurrent injuries were lower for the intervention group than for the control group(new injuries: RR, 0.410; 95% CI, 0.180-0.933; recurrent injuries: RR, 0.137; 95% CI, 0.037-0.509). The 15 injuries in the intervention group resulted in absence of 454 days from soccer (mean, 30.3; SD, 18.3; range, 7-64 days per injury), whereas 51 injuries in the control group resulted in 1344 days absent (mean, 26.4; SD, 19.5; range, 4-89 days per injury). Mean severity of injuries (days absent) was not significantly different (P = 0.16) between groups. Delayed onset muscle soreness,but no other adverse effect, was reported by most members of the intervention group during the training period.
CONCLUSIONS:
An eccentric hamstring exercise program was associated with lower rates of new and recurrent hamstring injuries in Danish male soccer players.
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squire12


Joined: 15 Mar 2013
Posts: 2415
PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9006698

Quote:
Am J Sports Med. 1997 Jan-Feb;25(1):81-5.
Preseason hamstring muscle weakness associated with hamstring muscle injury in Australian footballers.
Orchard J1, Marsden J, Lord S, Garlick D.
Author information
Abstract
Hamstring muscle strain is the most prevalent injury in Australian Rules Football, accounting for 16% of playing time missed as a result of injury. Thirty-seven professional footballers from an Australian Football League team had preseason measurements of hamstring and quadriceps muscle concentric peak torque at 60, 180, and 300 deg/sec measured on a Cybex 340 dynamometer. Players were studied prospectively throughout the 1995 season. During that time, six players sustained clinically diagnosed hamstring muscle injuries that caused them to miss match-playing time. The injured hamstring muscles were all weaker than in the opposite leg in absolute values and hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle ratios. According to our t-test results, hamstring muscle injury was significantly associated with a low hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle peak torque ratio at 60 deg/sec on the injured side and a low hamstring muscle side-to-side peak torque ratio at 60 deg/sec. Flexibility (as measured by the sit-and-reach test) did not correlate with injury. Discriminant-function analysis using the two significant ratio variables resulted in a canonical correlation with injury of 0.4594 and correctly classified legs into injury groups with 77.4% success. These results indicate that preseason isokinetic testing of professional Australian Rules footballers can identify players at risk of developing hamstring muscle strains.
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CWood21


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2014 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alright, this thread has already deviated from it's course. If you want to continue discussing yoga/stretching, the TAPT thread is a nice place I hear. Otherwise, more AR praise can go in the AR appreciation thread.
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