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diamondbull424


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SnA ExclusiVe wrote:
Yeah seriously as long as someone can make the correct line calls and at least put a body in front of someone, that's an improvement because right now people shoot through our A gaps at will and with nobody ever blocking them.

I also do not think the solution is getting more stop-gap players. That only works for so long (see: New York Jets). It sure looks good when it's working but when those guys retire, you're screwed because you didn't effectively replace them. I don't want a playmaking WR over a solid offensive lineman because, as we see, if you don't have an offensive line, you lose games no matter who your WR's are. We just had a game where Doss, Clark, and Jones all neared 100 yards in receiving and our offense was TERRIBLE! So how is having a dominant WR going to change that? You can't fix the fact that GB played 7 in the box and blitzed on 1st down and got through the A gaps by having a WR on the field. You fix that with better offensive line play.

Once you establish the offensive line, you can work your way out to the skill positions. Let's also not forget we are getting back Dennis Pitta next year, which will be huge for our passing game.

As I just outlined in my post to Manc, this isn't a black and white situation. The salary cap FORCES teams to invest in cheap players. Those cheap players are a) draft picks, b) ST caliber players, or c) underrated veterans. There are only so many draft resources at ones disposal.

So while I'm not against taking an OL high... it would most certainly NOT be a RT. If we MUST go OL, it should be with a center... which I believe is the second most important position on the OL (line calls + allows QB to step up in the pocket for throws).

But as it stands the centers in this draft are projected to go late 2nd. Thus going center in the first would be a very Cowboys type move assuming that perception holds. So if we're picking first round (and don't trade down) then it makes the most sense to me to go BPA... which has a strong chance of being WR- at this point.

It would be incredibly foolish to reach on a RT with our first round pick when the SCHEME of our OL is so flawed that it could help to render that talent useless anyway. At least with a TRULY talented WR with top 10 potential, we could put the game into Flacco's hands when the OL frauds in the run game... and if we fix the scheme with better coaching than all the more reason for a superb weapon for Flacco to utilize behind an OL that can run the ball and provide him with much better third down situations... and he could truly shine under a balanced attack.

But like I said, we may have flawed players- like McKinnie and Gradkowski... but at a certain point we have to realize that the SCHEME is the biggest issue. Teams with great OLs have great OL play, not usually BECAUSE of the players, but rather because of the scheme. For years Shananan had some great OL play in Denver with guys that were taken at the bottom of the draft or the middle of the draft because they were great scheme fits for his ZBS. The Texans went on to do the same thing with his heir apparent, Gark Kubiak.

Obviously the players matter and some players matter more than others, but the weakness of OUR offensive line, isn't particularly in the talent. What makes our talent less effective in run blocking than that GB unit?It's certainly not a difference in talent and/or draft position. Obviously Gino Gradkowski is simply not the answer no matter what scheme we're in. But Oher, for instance, was always a better player in a MBS. Kelechi Osemele would be a better fit in a MBS. Yanda can do both. And from what I've gathered from Jax fans, Monroe can do both, but isn't a good fit for certain ZBS (their current scheme).

So getting the right coaches to run a quality scheme is much more important than simply adding high round draft talent. Especially if that talent might not be the ideal scheme fit (Kelechi Osemele at LG).
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coordinator0


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheap veterans replacement can work and Baltimore needs that strategy to succeed given their way of doing things. The trick is finding which veterans are worth bringing in. I think it's harder with offensive lineman because teams just don't let their good blockers get away if they're cheap to bring back regardless of age. Players who can be in rotations, like a lot of the front seven guys on defense, are different. They're more replaceable in my opinion and thus less valued. Offensive lineman aren't rotational players. I'm not sure if I'm making sense to anybody but myself but I feel like there's a big difference.

I'm not sure if I'd rather try and find a cheap veteran at center or right tackle to be honest. Being a veteran at center means a whole lot more than being a veteran at right tackle for reasons that have been talked about like making line calls, recognizing defenses, etc. Of course if you get a young guy then you have a chance to let him grow with the team and be a cornerstone for years (or he could play his way out of the team's price range like Jason Brown but the same can be said of any player). It's an interesting dilemma.
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bmorecareful


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had no idea how much Birk meant to the Oline. Gradkowski has been horrible and as a result he is killing us at guard. Now that we have Jacoby back if we can stay healthy I believe our receiving corp will be a strength by the end of of the year. But nobody is confident in our center play. All stunts twists and delayed blitzes leave a free rusher every time It's called. Gradkowski allows men to cross his face damn near every running play and as a result our guards have to choose who to block instead of playing assignment football. Now They have been poor at times but we have seen their play with a competent center so for now they get the benefit of the doubt especially Yanda. If u would have told me losing Birk would be worst than losing Boldin Ellerbe etc etc, I would have thought u were crazy but it has been.
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diamondbull424


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coordinator0 wrote:
Cheap veterans replacement can work and Baltimore needs that strategy to succeed given their way of doing things. The trick is finding which veterans are worth bringing in. I think it's harder with offensive lineman because teams just don't let their good blockers get away if they're cheap to bring back regardless of age. Players who can be in rotations, like a lot of the front seven guys on defense, are different. They're more replaceable in my opinion and thus less valued. Offensive lineman aren't rotational players. I'm not sure if I'm making sense to anybody but myself but I feel like there's a big difference.

I'm not sure if I'd rather try and find a cheap veteran at center or right tackle to be honest. Being a veteran at center means a whole lot more than being a veteran at right tackle for reasons that have been talked about like making line calls, recognizing defenses, etc. Of course if you get a young guy then you have a chance to let him grow with the team and be a cornerstone for years (or he could play his way out of the team's price range like Jason Brown but the same can be said of any player). It's an interesting dilemma.

You make a great point about a veteran center being good for their experience with making line calls, but experience can be achieved at not just the NFL level.

Part of the issue with Gradkowski being so incredibly poor at making the line calls is simply that he has very little experience at ANY level making those calls. IIRC he only had two years starting experience at Deleware prior to being drafted.

This isn't to defend Gradkowski. Because that experience just doesn't happen over night. It took up until last season for Flacco to really get comfortable with navigating a pocket... we don't have that kind of time to wait with Gradkowski, especially since he doesn't have elite physical tools for the position- like Flacco had.

So back on point, experience can be gained at any level. Obviously a veteran with plenty of starting experience will have more than a rookie. But if that rookie has started four years for his college program... he brings a wealth of experience to the equation from the jump. He'd still need time to grow, but should be hitting his stride within a year or two in the league, like we can see with center options like Alex Mack, Ryan Kalil, Stefan Wisniewski, Nick Mangold, etc... and we successfully would get two cheap seasons out of that center after he's "hit his stride" before giving him his inevitable extension... which should coincide with Yanda retiring or getting a cheap veteran deal.

The most important point yet to be stated... drafting that center gives the line continuity for 8+ years. The same guy making line calls and leading the OL as opposed to inserting a "hopefully competent" veteran option into the fold every 2-3 seasons. So drafting a top crop talented center is a much bigger priority than drafting a bookend RT. You can replace a RT every few years as you're more in need of a talent injection, as opposed to both talent and smarts (or whatever we want to nickname the trait responsible for having a guy be competent at making the line calls at a high level).
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coordinator0


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

diamondbull424 wrote:
You make a great point about a veteran center being good for their experience with making line calls, but experience can be achieved at not just the NFL level.

Part of the issue with Gradkowski being so incredibly poor at making the line calls is simply that he has very little experience at ANY level making those calls. IIRC he only had two years starting experience at Deleware prior to being drafted.

This isn't to defend Gradkowski. Because that experience just doesn't happen over night. It took up until last season for Flacco to really get comfortable with navigating a pocket... we don't have that kind of time to wait with Gradkowski, especially since he doesn't have elite physical tools for the position- like Flacco had.

So back on point, experience can be gained at any level. Obviously a veteran with plenty of starting experience will have more than a rookie. But if that rookie has started four years for his college program... he brings a wealth of experience to the equation from the jump. He'd still need time to grow, but should be hitting his stride within a year or two in the league, like we can see with center options like Alex Mack, Ryan Kalil, Stefan Wisniewski, Nick Mangold, etc... and we successfully would get two cheap seasons out of that center after he's "hit his stride" before giving him his inevitable extension... which should coincide with Yanda retiring or getting a cheap veteran deal.

The most important point yet to be stated... drafting that center gives the line continuity for 8+ years. The same guy making line calls and leading the OL as opposed to inserting a "hopefully competent" veteran option into the fold every 2-3 seasons. So drafting a top crop talented center is a much bigger priority than drafting a bookend RT. You can replace a RT every few years as you're more in need of a talent injection, as opposed to both talent and smarts (or whatever we want to nickname the trait responsible for having a guy be competent at making the line calls at a high level).


Yeah Gradkowski wasn't a four year starter at Delaware and I believe only about half of those starts came at center. That kind of experience wasn't exactly what I was getting at though. More like NFL experience in reading defenses at that level. Most rookie centers don't come in and do that well unless they're elite. You only get that kind of experience by actually playing in the NFL. Do the Ravens want to draft a guy at that position high to groom and play at the same time or are they looking for a quicker fix? It's hard to tell.

I kind of alluded to your last point about continuity when I referenced Jason Brown. Sure drafting a center (that pans out) could give the line a centerpiece (no pun intended) for years to come but the team actually has to commit the money to keep that player around. The year they let brown walk was when Lewis, Suggs, and Scott were also free agents so they had some hard choices to make but they're making those kind of decisions every year and it's not going to be any different going forward as long as there's still a ton of talented players on the roster. Maybe the front office just doesn't put a ton of monetary value into the center position. Like I said before it's hard to tell.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well now the subject is being mulled over, does anyone have any suggestions as to who might be available as a vet RT next summer?

I know Brandon Albert is going to be UFA, but he's clearly not the sort of guy we're talking about.

Tyson Clabo? David Diehl? Are they the sort of guys who might be good pickups? Cheaper than Oher, but probably not dirt cheap.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everything I've heard is that Diehl and Clabo are pretty terrible at this point in their careers. We saw Clabo firsthand in the Miami game. Looking over the free agent list it's hard finding any players that are still useful but could be had at a lower price. Maybe Winston, but I'm not sure how he's doing these days. Winston Justice? Meh. This isn't an enjoyable exercise. Laughing
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coordinator0 wrote:
Everything I've heard is that Diehl and Clabo are pretty terrible at this point in their careers. We saw Clabo firsthand in the Miami game. Looking over the free agent list it's hard finding any players that are still useful but could be had at a lower price. Maybe Winston, but I'm not sure how he's doing these days. Winston Justice? Meh. This isn't an enjoyable exercise. Laughing


What about Ricky Wagner? He was a projected first rounder as an ot prior to last season IIRC.
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diamondbull424


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coordinator0 wrote:

Yeah Gradkowski wasn't a four year starter at Delaware and I believe only about half of those starts came at center. That kind of experience wasn't exactly what I was getting at though. More like NFL experience in reading defenses at that level. Most rookie centers don't come in and do that well unless they're elite. You only get that kind of experience by actually playing in the NFL. Do the Ravens want to draft a guy at that position high to groom and play at the same time or are they looking for a quicker fix? It's hard to tell.

I wasn't saying that reading NFL defenses are going to be simple or easy. But obviously a guy like Travis Swanson with four years starting experience going up against SEC defenses is going to have the experience of having seen multiple fronts and alignments and talented defenders. Like I said, college experience isn't the same as NFL experience, however that kind of experience is going to make it much easier for a college center to transplant from the college level to the NFL level and continue his success.

It's similar to how Andrew Luck had years of experience operating a pro-style offense at Stanford vs. a guy like Joe Flacco who only had two years in a spread system at Delaware. Luck's experience made him more pro-ready to get the job done without having to be as protected.

I knew you were referring to NFL starting experience. But we have to be realistic. The chances are slim that we'll find another Matt Birk option in FA. A former multi-probowl player that still had a little bit left in the tank that's willing to sign for peanuts. More likely we'd find a Matt Flynn or Casey Rabach. NFL teams very rarely let talented centers and LTs hit FA, whereas they're much more likely to let their talented RTs and OGs hit FA. So assuming most centers with Birk's level of experience will have nothing left in the tank or, like Gurode, will have suffered a debilitating injury it's just not realistic to expect talented center options to hit FA. It's usually mediocre players with decent experience or very much past their prime starters like Jeff Saturday.

So back to my point... of the options, it seems simply investing in our own talented center option makes the most sense. And if the guy we invest in, unlike Gradkowski, actually brings a wealth of experience to the table... then that makes him much more likely to transition well to this level quickly.

coordinator0 wrote:
I kind of alluded to your last point about continuity when I referenced Jason Brown. Sure drafting a center (that pans out) could give the line a centerpiece (no pun intended) for years to come but the team actually has to commit the money to keep that player around. The year they let brown walk was when Lewis, Suggs, and Scott were also free agents so they had some hard choices to make but they're making those kind of decisions every year and it's not going to be any different going forward as long as there's still a ton of talented players on the roster. Maybe the front office just doesn't put a ton of monetary value into the center position. Like I said before it's hard to tell.

I don't think Brown should be used as an example for doubting whether or not we're committed to the center position. Brown, despite his physical gifts, was pretty weak when it came to making the proper line calls. Brown simply wasn't an elite center option, yet he wanted to be paid like one. IIRC he got a record contract for a center (or interior lineman) at the time of his signing.

The front office was never going to overpay for him to keep him. We offered him a reasonable deal and he declined it... and even called the Ravens front office cheap and not willing to invest in the offense... but they probably also saw things that we didn't. Brown quickly fell apart after he went to St. Louis and whatever helped to make him ineffective there, likely were things Ozzie and company got to see here. Brown was also better as a guard for us then he was at center. The front office also let Ben Grubbs walk, but that didn't mean they weren't aggressive in resigning Marshal Yanda and in drafting Kelechi Osemele. The fact of the matter is that after Brown, we were blessed with the opportunity to have Matt Birk fall into our laps and we simply didn't have a need at center and could afford to allocate our resources elsewhere.

And the Ravens clearly thought they might have their solution with Gino Gradkowski being Birk's heir apparent and so they hadn't a need to invest further than that 4th on Gradkowski.

So I don't think it's fair to suggest that the front office might only be looking for the quick fix with a center and don't overall value the position, while seemingly valuing the other OL spots. I'm sure if Jason Brown were ACTUALLY an elite center, we would have been more than happy to pay him. But it's "right player, right price" and Brown's price far exceeded what we thought him to be worth.

I'm sure if we were to draft a Nick Mangold, we would be very diligent in holding onto him- just like any other elite player we've drafted.
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diamondbull424


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sp6488 wrote:
coordinator0 wrote:
Everything I've heard is that Diehl and Clabo are pretty terrible at this point in their careers. We saw Clabo firsthand in the Miami game. Looking over the free agent list it's hard finding any players that are still useful but could be had at a lower price. Maybe Winston, but I'm not sure how he's doing these days. Winston Justice? Meh. This isn't an enjoyable exercise. Laughing


What about Ricky Wagner? He was a projected first rounder as an ot prior to last season IIRC.

He was mostly projected to go first round because of his lineage as a Wisconsin OL as opposed to his actual talent.

In reality, he was always probably nothing more than a 3rd round talent at best.

That said, I'm just debating his draft hype and not his ability to succeed as an NFL RT. Obviously, he'll be present for the RT positional battle and you never know how he'll end up working out with a full offseason under his belt.

In terms of FA options Eric Winston is a guy whose been above average at RT and only signed for $1.25m last season. He's sort of a Bernard Pollard, doesn't stay in one place very long, but he'd only be a stop gap option while we evaluate what Ricky Wagner has to offer and whatever rookie we draft has to offer all while not being forced to depend on them. He'd also be a great scheme fit if we keep the same running scheme going forward.

Another option, and probably the option that's growing on me the most, would be to kick Kelechi Osemele back out to RT, where he proved to be a dominant run blocker, but inconsistent in pass protection. Draft a talented blocking TE to help KO in that regard (and because we could use one anyway), we could sign a stop gap LG. And/or draft an OG option in the midrounds. Someone like Xavier Su'a-Filo from UCLA would be a great fit for us at LG in our scheme.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

diamondbull424 wrote:
I wasn't saying that reading NFL defenses are going to be simple or easy. But obviously a guy like Travis Swanson with four years starting experience going up against SEC defenses is going to have the experience of having seen multiple fronts and alignments and talented defenders. Like I said, college experience isn't the same as NFL experience, however that kind of experience is going to make it much easier for a college center to transplant from the college level to the NFL level and continue his success.

It's similar to how Andrew Luck had years of experience operating a pro-style offense at Stanford vs. a guy like Joe Flacco who only had two years in a spread system at Delaware. Luck's experience made him more pro-ready to get the job done without having to be as protected.

I knew you were referring to NFL starting experience. But we have to be realistic. The chances are slim that we'll find another Matt Birk option in FA. A former multi-probowl player that still had a little bit left in the tank that's willing to sign for peanuts. More likely we'd find a Matt Flynn or Casey Rabach. NFL teams very rarely let talented centers and LTs hit FA, whereas they're much more likely to let their talented RTs and OGs hit FA. So assuming most centers with Birk's level of experience will have nothing left in the tank or, like Gurode, will have suffered a debilitating injury it's just not realistic to expect talented center options to hit FA. It's usually mediocre players with decent experience or very much past their prime starters like Jeff Saturday.

So back to my point... of the options, it seems simply investing in our own talented center option makes the most sense. And if the guy we invest in, unlike Gradkowski, actually brings a wealth of experience to the table... then that makes him much more likely to transition well to this level quickly.


I think we agree on the experience factor we're just getting at it in different ways. And I wasn't expecting or assuming a Birk-level center was going to fall in Baltimore's lap this offseason. The same goes for right tackle though. Barring cuts this isn't going to be a good free agent class for veteran tackles. To me it's a pick your poison situation. Maybe Osemele kicks back out to right tackle, which would leave a hole at left guard but I'd be more comfortable trying to fill that with a value veteran signing than right tackle after looking at the options that will be available. In general I prefer youth/athleticism on the outside anyways so that's a double bonus for me. If Baltimore is going to continue using Castillo's scheme I'd rather have Osemele at right tackle anyways. He does not look good on the inside in that system.

Quote:
I don't think Brown should be used as an example for doubting whether or not we're committed to the center position. Brown, despite his physical gifts, was pretty weak when it came to making the proper line calls. Brown simply wasn't an elite center option, yet he wanted to be paid like one. IIRC he got a record contract for a center (or interior lineman) at the time of his signing.

The front office was never going to overpay for him to keep him. We offered him a reasonable deal and he declined it... and even called the Ravens front office cheap and not willing to invest in the offense... but they probably also saw things that we didn't. Brown quickly fell apart after he went to St. Louis and whatever helped to make him ineffective there, likely were things Ozzie and company got to see here. Brown was also better as a guard for us then he was at center. The front office also let Ben Grubbs walk, but that didn't mean they weren't aggressive in resigning Marshal Yanda and in drafting Kelechi Osemele. The fact of the matter is that after Brown, we were blessed with the opportunity to have Matt Birk fall into our laps and we simply didn't have a need at center and could afford to allocate our resources elsewhere.

And the Ravens clearly thought they might have their solution with Gino Gradkowski being Birk's heir apparent and so they hadn't a need to invest further than that 4th on Gradkowski.

So I don't think it's fair to suggest that the front office might only be looking for the quick fix with a center and don't overall value the position, while seemingly valuing the other OL spots. I'm sure if Jason Brown were ACTUALLY an elite center, we would have been more than happy to pay him. But it's "right player, right price" and Brown's price far exceeded what we thought him to be worth.

I'm sure if we were to draft a Nick Mangold, we would be very diligent in holding onto him- just like any other elite player we've drafted.


Right player, right price is what I was thinking of, but is a center the right player in their eyes? Who knows. Brown is the only example to go off of for the Ravens. It probably does vary depending on the situation but some teams value certain positions less than others. Guard is different from center like tackle is different from guard so the Yanda/Grubbs/Osemele moves aren't not something I think is relevant here. That's just the way I look at the offensive line though. The offensive line as a whole is a unit but separation still exists. For what it's worth I do think interior players are just as important as tackles. Especially for a quarterback like Flacco.

I'm not sure what you're getting at with the drafting of Gradkowski because that's not something I was hinting at or trying use as an example. They needed to see what he could do before they went out and invested anything else in the position (well, besides acquiring Shipley on the cheap but that barely counts in my opinion). I'm not sure if Baltimore will be in a position to draft a center prospect on the level of Mangold this year (nobody sticks out as an elite option) so I'm not particularly worried (err, not the right word but it gets the point across) about that situation playing out.
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SnA ExclusiVe


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well from reading Harbs' presser today, looks like they might be considering going back to a power run scheme instead or in addition to the zone scheme we currently run.

Which, to me, makes no sense because changing schemes doesn't change the fact we can't account for blitzing LB'ers through the freaking A and B gaps. Not only that, Rice isn't a power back - never was. He's a finesse back, and right now he's really not even that. NOT ONLY THAT, but Harbs also said we have the personnel currently on the roster to fix said running problems, but honestly unless Shipley can fix things, we do not have the personnel on the roster to fix our problem at Center.

Seems to me, once again, Harbs isn't willing to put the responsibility of failure on his coaching staff. Maybe in 4 years or so he'll finally figure it out in week 14 or whatever and fire Moeller. Until then, here's to wishful thinking.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You manage to always let yourself get way too riled up about press conference comments.

It's coachspeak. The fact that Harbaugh doesn't come out every week and air the organization's dirty laundry to the media doesn't mean jack. He doesn't need to announce to the fans every week what is being done behind closed doors to try to rectify the situation. Our offensive line doesn't get magically better if Harbaugh comes out and says that Moeller sucks. Harbaugh publicly saying that we don't have the personnel to succeed helps no one, and probably just hurts us by kicking our dead linemen when they're already down. All it would do is practically wave a white flag after 6 games. The idea that somehow the coaching staff isn't doing what they can to find improvement in the offensive line is a view designed to flatter the all-knowing fan at the expense of the always-easy-to-blame coaching staff. These are superficial feel-good moves that accomplish nothing. It's not like Harbs has acted like things are going well; he's just not going to publicly surrender and act like all is lost. The fact that Harbaugh isn't firing people 6 weeks into the season doesn't mean he somehow doesn't believe in personal responsibility; the far less exciting reason may just be that he doesn't believe much will improve by firing anyone at the moment. Maybe that changes, I don't know, but I'm also not sure what the history of firing position coaches midseason even looks like.

Firing position coaches midseason as far as I know doesn't happen very often. It's not like firing a coordinator (which is a rare move in itself, but making a change in playcalling is an easier quick transition). This is the hand we're going to deal with until the season is over. And given none of us can accurately pinpoint whether it's Castillo or Moeller that's the main problem with the offensive line from a coaching standpoint, it's even more puzzling that you're so sure that everything will be better if we fire Moeller (who, by most accounts, has taken a deputy role to Castillo this year). Would having just Castillo insure success given the offensive line is worse this year than last year and Castillo is the new addition? And are we sure Castillo is the reason the offensive line is worse rather than a simple issue of having inferior personnel at the center position?
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, as I pointed out to Flaccomania on Twitter, Aaron Wilson posted the most alarming stat I've seen:

Ravens rushed the ball 22 times, and of those 22 rushes, 5 were for negative yards, and 5 went for no gain.

Almost half of our rushing attempts didn't gain a yard or lost yards. Good job, good effort coaching staff and offensive line!
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 14, 2013 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man, I don't even want to hear about the problem at center. So we have a bad starter in Gino. Everyone else on our line is a really good athlete for their position. And you got a Rice/Pierce/Leach backfield. There's more than enough there.

Coach. Execute. Get it done.
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