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Week 3 GDT- Detroit Lions @ Washington Redskins
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Who ya got?
Detroit Lions
40%
 40%  [ 8 ]
Washington Redskins
45%
 45%  [ 9 ]
NFL Referees
15%
 15%  [ 3 ]
Total Votes : 20

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theuntouchable


Joined: 15 Mar 2010
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rockcity wrote:
stylish313 wrote:
After 3 weeks, Ndamukong still leads all defensive linemen in QB hurries. It's too bad they haven't landed him any sacks yet. And he's making more of an impact against the run than he ever has since he's been in the NFL. Seems like both he and Gunn came to an agreement, and that's the realization that Suh can be even more dominant if he's allowed to do more than just pin back his ears and rush the QB.

I was hard on our defensive ends going into the season, but it appears after three games that they're a legit strength of this football team. Both Young and Ansah have been stellar up to this point. Keep it up Ezekiel and you'll earn DROY honors. Losing JJ is a blow but he wasn't playing as well as many here seem to think. I think Taylor will be able to replace him with little or no drop off.

Stafford had his most inaccurate game of the season. He missed CJ for a couple of scores and I think he was off target on that INT. But with that said, he limited his TOs to none after that early one and still managed the game well for almost 400 yards- I'll take that on an off day. Someone needs to do him a favor and keep his boy off the field. Seems he's trying hard to make Durham look good, and that's just not possible. Thank goodness Broyles should be receiving increased targets (3 this week) in the upcoming weeks.

Pettigrew only received 1 target against Washington, but still played 56 out of 67 snaps. Linehan's offenses have always targeted their TEs heavily. He and Stafford both must have completely lost faith in his ability to help move this offense. Scheffler and Furia combined for 33 snaps, after combining for merely 11 a week ago.

If Nate stays healthy, we may have our first 1k receiving tandem since the days of Moore and Perriman. He's tied for 5th in the league with 19 receptions, and he's 9th in the league with 239 yards.

DeAndre Levy has allowed the third most yards through the air amongst 4-3 OLBs with 139; and has the 5th worst average allowing 13.9 per reception. He'll need to keep making splash plays to hide the ugliness of his pass defense.
ya these qbs see suh or anyone thet chuck it....does intentional ground exist for the lions..ziggy should have more sacks than he does and its great our des actually defend the run

Its weird that you wrote what you did about taylor..people were saying that about young (no drop off) and you went off... funny thing is young looks better than avril.

My beef is with delmas.. he looks like a liability. He seems late to the play for to often and has whiff a ton. We need to find a saftey and another cb


What play(s) did delmas whiff on or was late to? Just curious.
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FootballPhreak


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)

Players will fail, they are human and that is unavoidable. And with the salary cap the talent level across all teams is reasonably similar. It is up to the GM to put the money in the most impactful positions and most talented players for their money(bang for the buck if you will) and it is up to the coaches to play to those players strengths, analyze opposing formations, and be unpredictable so as to get the most out of those very human and imperfect players.

Blaming failure on player execution, which will never be perfect, is letting the coaching staff off the hook for some very bad calls, It is a cop out.
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TL-TwoWinsAway


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)

Players will fail, they are human and that is unavoidable. And with the salary cap the talent level across all teams is reasonably similar. It is up to the GM to put the money in the most impactful positions and most talented players for their money(bang for the buck if you will) and it is up to the coaches to play to those players strengths, analyze opposing formations, and be unpredictable so as to get the most out of those very human and imperfect players.

Blaming failure on player execution, which will never be perfect, is letting the coaching staff off the hook for some very bad calls, It is a cop out.

Oh. If "players will fail", because player execution will "never be perfect", shouldn't we apply the same standard to coaching decisions? (Nice argument.)
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FootballPhreak


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)

Players will fail, they are human and that is unavoidable. And with the salary cap the talent level across all teams is reasonably similar. It is up to the GM to put the money in the most impactful positions and most talented players for their money(bang for the buck if you will) and it is up to the coaches to play to those players strengths, analyze opposing formations, and be unpredictable so as to get the most out of those very human and imperfect players.

Blaming failure on player execution, which will never be perfect, is letting the coaching staff off the hook for some very bad calls, It is a cop out.

Oh. If "players will fail", because player execution will "never be perfect", shouldn't we apply the same standard to coaching decisions? (Nice argument.)

Certainly. But the good coaches do it far less often and the salary restrictions that don't allow you to get a lopsided amount of talent in players do not apply to coaches.
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TL-TwoWinsAway


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)

Players will fail, they are human and that is unavoidable. And with the salary cap the talent level across all teams is reasonably similar. It is up to the GM to put the money in the most impactful positions and most talented players for their money(bang for the buck if you will) and it is up to the coaches to play to those players strengths, analyze opposing formations, and be unpredictable so as to get the most out of those very human and imperfect players.

Blaming failure on player execution, which will never be perfect, is letting the coaching staff off the hook for some very bad calls, It is a cop out.

Oh. If "players will fail", because player execution will "never be perfect", shouldn't we apply the same standard to coaching decisions? (Nice argument.)

Certainly. But the good coaches do it far less often and the salary restrictions that don't allow you to get a lopsided amount of talent in players do not apply to coaches.

Our offense has more than enough talent to not "expect them to fail to execute".
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SuhPLEX


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

even a poor call that is executed properly will yield a positive result. A good coach give players an opportunity to execute
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Cruz is one of best WR in the game


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(Eli) Manning has a new look offense and he has looked really good in it.


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FootballPhreak


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)

Players will fail, they are human and that is unavoidable. And with the salary cap the talent level across all teams is reasonably similar. It is up to the GM to put the money in the most impactful positions and most talented players for their money(bang for the buck if you will) and it is up to the coaches to play to those players strengths, analyze opposing formations, and be unpredictable so as to get the most out of those very human and imperfect players.

Blaming failure on player execution, which will never be perfect, is letting the coaching staff off the hook for some very bad calls, It is a cop out.

Oh. If "players will fail", because player execution will "never be perfect", shouldn't we apply the same standard to coaching decisions? (Nice argument.)

Certainly. But the good coaches do it far less often and the salary restrictions that don't allow you to get a lopsided amount of talent in players do not apply to coaches.

Our offense has more than enough talent to not "expect them to fail to execute".

In no way does talent take away human deficiencies. And as an overall unit, our offense is not far more talented than defenses we go up against. So talent is rendered a minimal factor.

In the end it falls on the coaches. Blaming imperfect humans for doing what they are expected to do (be imperfect) is a copout for below average coaching.
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TL-TwoWinsAway


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FootballPhreak wrote:
In no way does talent take away human deficiencies. And as an overall unit, our offense is not far more talented than defenses we go up against. So talent is rendered a minimal factor.

In the end it falls on the coaches. Blaming imperfect humans for doing what they are expected to do (be imperfect) is a copout for below average coaching.

... what? Phreak: coaches are also human. They are imperfect in the same way. They also make mistakes. Better coaches make fewer mistakes. Better players make fewer mistakes. It's the same.

It's my opinion that the players on this team fail to execute far more than they should (dropped passes, blown coverage, missed tackles, boneheaded plays), which puts it on them.
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theuntouchable


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
In no way does talent take away human deficiencies. And as an overall unit, our offense is not far more talented than defenses we go up against. So talent is rendered a minimal factor.

In the end it falls on the coaches. Blaming imperfect humans for doing what they are expected to do (be imperfect) is a copout for below average coaching.

... what? Phreak: coaches are also human. They are imperfect in the same way. They also make mistakes. Better coaches make fewer mistakes. Better players make fewer mistakes. It's the same.

It's my opinion that the players on this team fail to execute far more than they should (dropped passes, blown coverage, missed tackles, boneheaded plays), which puts it on them.


Its not the same though because coaches are held to a higher standard in regards to the mistakes they make and rightfully so. More often than not a "player" mistake can be easily corrected. Maybe he stepped wrong, didnt catch with his hands, curled off his route etc. Which are all easily correctable mistakes. Whereas if a coach makes a mistake or error in judgement the end result is generally more quantifiable and results in greater impact (generally). Not only that but a coach mistake (more often than not) is not a simple fix as it deals directly with the coachs mental decisions. Something that is not easily fixed through repitition or coaching. A coach general makes a repeated mistake if it is a core problem and simply cannot be fixed.

For example Linehan. His same downfalls today, are the same as they were when he was in MN. The same things that he is constantly scrutinized for today are precisely (or dang near close to it) the same as they were years ago. Which can only mean that it is an underlying issue that cannot be tweaked or easily modified.

If a player is constantly making mistakes, then it still routes back to coaching because either they have not done enough to correct that individual or have not replaced them as they should have. Much like many of the same mistakes being made lately by the Lions.
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TL-TwoWinsAway


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

theuntouchable wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
In no way does talent take away human deficiencies. And as an overall unit, our offense is not far more talented than defenses we go up against. So talent is rendered a minimal factor.

In the end it falls on the coaches. Blaming imperfect humans for doing what they are expected to do (be imperfect) is a copout for below average coaching.

... what? Phreak: coaches are also human. They are imperfect in the same way. They also make mistakes. Better coaches make fewer mistakes. Better players make fewer mistakes. It's the same.

It's my opinion that the players on this team fail to execute far more than they should (dropped passes, blown coverage, missed tackles, boneheaded plays), which puts it on them.


Its not the same though because coaches are held to a higher standard in regards to the mistakes they make and rightfully so. More often than not a "player" mistake can be easily corrected. Maybe he stepped wrong, didnt catch with his hands, curled off his route etc. Which are all easily correctable mistakes. Whereas if a coach makes a mistake or error in judgement the end result is generally more quantifiable and results in greater impact (generally). Not only that but a coach mistake (more often than not) is not a simple fix as it deals directly with the coachs mental decisions. Something that is not easily fixed through repitition or coaching. A coach general makes a repeated mistake if it is a core problem and simply cannot be fixed.

For example Linehan. His same downfalls today, are the same as they were when he was in MN. The same things that he is constantly scrutinized for today are precisely (or dang near close to it) the same as they were years ago. Which can only mean that it is an underlying issue that cannot be tweaked or easily modified.

If a player is constantly making mistakes, then it still routes back to coaching because either they have not done enough to correct that individual or have not replaced them as they should have. Much like many of the same mistakes being made lately by the Lions.

In terms of on-field mistakes, coaches should be held to a higher standard? I disagree: I think they should be held to the same standard. Both players and coaches are paid a lot of money, and both are adults: one shouldn't receive less criticism.

I think these "repetitive mistakes" by the coaching staff is simply the scheme that Linehan runs, which doesn't appeal to fans, but is effective. Fans view frequent slant routes as "mistakes", while the coaching staff likely views them as the best option for the particular situation. If the players execute, there's often no complaint. If they don't, blame can be placed on both sides.

But, question: do you feel that this team lacks players talented enough to be responsible for their mistakes?
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FootballPhreak


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Again, you are disregarding the effect of the salary cap. Sure, a single player may be immensely more talented and less prone to human mistakes than another single player. But 11 players all averaged out over an entire team are going to be pretty close to the same in a salary cap league to 11 other players.

However a single coach can make a huge difference in the preperation those players receive, playing to his players strengths, and good playcalling. Hence the coach less prone to human mistakes (but still prone to human imperfection) has a much more tremendous effect on a team as a whole. Blaming the players that are, as a whole, not significantly better or worse than the team they are opposing is misplaced.
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theuntouchable


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
theuntouchable wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
In no way does talent take away human deficiencies. And as an overall unit, our offense is not far more talented than defenses we go up against. So talent is rendered a minimal factor.

In the end it falls on the coaches. Blaming imperfect humans for doing what they are expected to do (be imperfect) is a copout for below average coaching.

... what? Phreak: coaches are also human. They are imperfect in the same way. They also make mistakes. Better coaches make fewer mistakes. Better players make fewer mistakes. It's the same.

It's my opinion that the players on this team fail to execute far more than they should (dropped passes, blown coverage, missed tackles, boneheaded plays), which puts it on them.


Its not the same though because coaches are held to a higher standard in regards to the mistakes they make and rightfully so. More often than not a "player" mistake can be easily corrected. Maybe he stepped wrong, didnt catch with his hands, curled off his route etc. Which are all easily correctable mistakes. Whereas if a coach makes a mistake or error in judgement the end result is generally more quantifiable and results in greater impact (generally). Not only that but a coach mistake (more often than not) is not a simple fix as it deals directly with the coachs mental decisions. Something that is not easily fixed through repitition or coaching. A coach general makes a repeated mistake if it is a core problem and simply cannot be fixed.

For example Linehan. His same downfalls today, are the same as they were when he was in MN. The same things that he is constantly scrutinized for today are precisely (or dang near close to it) the same as they were years ago. Which can only mean that it is an underlying issue that cannot be tweaked or easily modified.

If a player is constantly making mistakes, then it still routes back to coaching because either they have not done enough to correct that individual or have not replaced them as they should have. Much like many of the same mistakes being made lately by the Lions.

In terms of on-field mistakes, coaches should be held to a higher standard? I disagree: I think they should be held to the same standard. Both players and coaches are paid a lot of money, and both are adults: one shouldn't receive less criticism.

I think these "repetitive mistakes" by the coaching staff is simply the scheme that Linehan runs, which doesn't appeal to fans, but is effective. Fans view frequent slant routes as "mistakes", while the coaching staff likely views them as the best option for the particular situation. If the players execute, there's often no complaint. If they don't, blame can be placed on both sides.

But, question: do you feel that this team lacks players talented enough to be responsible for their mistakes?


Im speaking in terms of mistakes.

How many superbowl winning teams has Linehan been a part of? So how effective has it really been. I dont know about you but I, personally, would like to see the Lions win a superbowl before I croak.

Yes, coaches will be held to a higher standard. Their decisions are the result of countless numbers of hours put into design and technique towards execution. They then have to teach the players to act appropiately to fill out every corner of said design. Their decisions are months sometimes even years in the making.

The players decisions/acts are the result of a few months training and an avg 7 second play where they process information and react within seconds.

If your coaches have more than, as much, or anywhere near as many mistakes; you have a problem.

Talented enough to be responsible for their mistakes? Not sure I follow as talent has nothing to do with being responsible for their mistakes. Being responsible for your mistakes means making them and doing your best not to have them reappear. That has nothing to do with how "talented" a player is. If they continuously make the same mistakes then its a problem with the coaching because either A. That player needs to go B. That player needs to be taught better
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)


Then why- according to your argument from another thread- does the staff use Pettigrew as the blocking tight end? Why can't they play Fauria and expect him to be just as good of a blocker as Pettigrew? He should be able to execute, no?
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TL-TwoWinsAway


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BlackandBlue wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)


Then why- according to your argument from another thread- does the staff use Pettigrew as the blocking tight end? Why can't they play Fauria and expect him to be just as good of a blocker as Pettigrew? He should be able to execute, no?

... no. Pettigrew is a blocker, while Fauria is a pass-catcher. This supports my point: I stated that using a speed RB as a between-the-tackles option was a mistake, so using a receiving TE to block consistently would be similar.

My point here, though, is about players failing to do the things within their capabilities. Dropped passes. Missed blocks my offensive linemen. I don't feel that players have routinely been used outside of their capabilities (sans Bush/Best, as already said), so I'm not concerned.

theuntouchable wrote:
How many superbowl winning teams has Linehan been a part of?

Interesting. I guess we can scratch most coaches off the list.

theuntouchable wrote:
Talented enough to be responsible for their mistakes? Not sure I follow as talent has nothing to do with being responsible for their mistakes. Being responsible for your mistakes means making them and doing your best not to have them reappear. That has nothing to do with how "talented" a player is. If they continuously make the same mistakes then its a problem with the coaching because either A. That player needs to go B. That player needs to be taught better

Eh, whatever. Poor choice of words, I guess. Talent. Ability. Skillset. Mentality. Capability. Whatever word best fits: are out players "mentally capable" enough to be responsible for their own "mistakes" (which, in this conversation, means "failed execution")?
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 23, 2013 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
BlackandBlue wrote:
TL-TwoWinsAway wrote:
FootballPhreak wrote:
When the coordinator calls plays that are predictable, play to players' weaknesses, or play directly into the opposition's formation; then I expect the players to fail to execute. That is not on the players, that is being set upfor failure.

I never expect players to fail to execute... I think that's a cop out. I expect my pass-catcher to run the correct route and make a play on the ball, regardless of the call or defense. (I also expect my elite WR to be able to beat Deangelo Hall on a slant route.)

It's like running it up the middle on 4th and 1. If that fails, I blame the players. Yeah, the defense knew it was coming, but a running game should be able to gain one yard, regardless.

(My greatest point of criticism with the coaching staff is their insistence in running speed backs between the tackles, but even then I understand it: they're trying to avoid being predictable.)


Then why- according to your argument from another thread- does the staff use Pettigrew as the blocking tight end? Why can't they play Fauria and expect him to be just as good of a blocker as Pettigrew? He should be able to execute, no?

... no. Pettigrew is a blocker, while Fauria is a pass-catcher. This supports my point: I stated that using a speed RB as a between-the-tackles option was a mistake, so using a receiving TE to block consistently would be similar.

My point here, though, is about players failing to do the things within their capabilities. Dropped passes. Missed blocks my offensive linemen. I don't feel that players have routinely been used outside of their capabilities (sans Bush/Best, as already said), so I'm not concerned.

theuntouchable wrote:
How many superbowl winning teams has Linehan been a part of?

Interesting. I guess we can scratch most coaches off the list.

theuntouchable wrote:
Talented enough to be responsible for their mistakes? Not sure I follow as talent has nothing to do with being responsible for their mistakes. Being responsible for your mistakes means making them and doing your best not to have them reappear. That has nothing to do with how "talented" a player is. If they continuously make the same mistakes then its a problem with the coaching because either A. That player needs to go B. That player needs to be taught better

Eh, whatever. Poor choice of words, I guess. Talent. Ability. Skillset. Mentality. Capability. Whatever word best fits: are out players "mentally capable" enough to be responsible for their own "mistakes" (which, in this conversation, means "failed execution")?


Apparently, because I ctriticize one coach it means all coaches without a superbowl in their resume are excluded ....

Linehan has been around a while and his past offenses have had the same issues and he really hasnt upgraded the attack all that much. So you can stop with the overreaction.

Not sure what you're trying to get at with the other point even without the poor choice of words. Players are paid millions of dollars to be responsible for their mistakes, thats a given. Coaches are going to be held to a higher standard because of common sense. A failed execution is a result of a 7 (give or take) second play, obviously, there are going to be far more errors given that situation compared to someone who has time to create, build and implement an offensive gameplan.

A player is absolutely responsible for his mistakes, never argued otherwise. However, a coach can absolutely be resonsible not only for his mistakes but his players as well.

A coach is, and should be, held to a high standard.
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anyone around?

I feel..so cold.
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