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The Reality of Jarvis "Dawg Bones" Jones
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at23steelers


Joined: 05 Mar 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

armsteeld wrote:
at23steelers wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
If only we can land Arthur Brown or Jamie Collins!! Then our LB core will be rebuilt for years to come.


Arthur Brown I get, but Jamie Collins? Is that if they kick Jones inside?


I feel Jamie Collins can be a better ILB than OLB. I like his stack and shed ability. He can cover and alongside Timmons, he can be a heat seeking missile. Give Jones the first shot to prove that he can be the go getter from OLB, if he can beat out Worilds.

Question: If we can get Collins or Arthur Brown, would you welcome trading Lamar Woodley?



LMAO...no...I wouldnt even remotely entertain the notion.


TROLOLOL we need Hibernation Queen on this team!!!


Huh? Could you elaborate?


Woodley was injured last year. Give the dude a break. He's a top 5 OLB in the league. Worilds and Jarvis Jones starting? haha
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FourThreeMafia


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

at23steelers wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
at23steelers wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
If only we can land Arthur Brown or Jamie Collins!! Then our LB core will be rebuilt for years to come.


Arthur Brown I get, but Jamie Collins? Is that if they kick Jones inside?


I feel Jamie Collins can be a better ILB than OLB. I like his stack and shed ability. He can cover and alongside Timmons, he can be a heat seeking missile. Give Jones the first shot to prove that he can be the go getter from OLB, if he can beat out Worilds.

Question: If we can get Collins or Arthur Brown, would you welcome trading Lamar Woodley?



LMAO...no...I wouldnt even remotely entertain the notion.


TROLOLOL we need Hibernation Queen on this team!!!


Huh? Could you elaborate?


Woodley was injured last year. Give the dude a break. He's a top 5 OLB in the league. Worilds and Jarvis Jones starting? haha


Woodley was simply out of shape most of the year.

However, I wouldnt trade him. I still think he can be an elite player. I do think he will be much better in 2013.
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armsteeld


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FourThreeMafia wrote:
at23steelers wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
at23steelers wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
FourThreeMafia wrote:
armsteeld wrote:
If only we can land Arthur Brown or Jamie Collins!! Then our LB core will be rebuilt for years to come.


Arthur Brown I get, but Jamie Collins? Is that if they kick Jones inside?


I feel Jamie Collins can be a better ILB than OLB. I like his stack and shed ability. He can cover and alongside Timmons, he can be a heat seeking missile. Give Jones the first shot to prove that he can be the go getter from OLB, if he can beat out Worilds.

Question: If we can get Collins or Arthur Brown, would you welcome trading Lamar Woodley?



LMAO...no...I wouldnt even remotely entertain the notion.


TROLOLOL we need Hibernation Queen on this team!!!


Huh? Could you elaborate?


Woodley was injured last year. Give the dude a break. He's a top 5 OLB in the league. Worilds and Jarvis Jones starting? haha


Woodley was simply out of shape most of the year.

However, I wouldnt trade him. I still think he can be an elite player. I do think he will be much better in 2013.


Woodley, to me is someone I haven't really loved. He has his moments but to me he lacks countermoves and is a speed to power guy only. Once his bullrush is countered, he tends to "bearhug" and is useless. Last year, due to Harrison missing time, Woodley was scrutinized more.
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AlanFanecaFan


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woodlry is on this team for st least 2 more seasons probably 3 due to restructuring him twice.

Sad but true.
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SteelKing728


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dawg Bones, I love it.

Nice pick by the Steelers. Jones has big shoes to fill, but maybe he has a chip on his shoulder.

Good move by the Steelers!

oh, and does anyone know what number he'll be?
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dawgsfan


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

congrats on getting this guy. I will now own two Pittsburgh jerseys (#86 being the other).

Best player that i've seen play at UGA since David Pollack and I think Jones is better. I think this is going to be a great match for you all.
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armsteeld


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dawgsfan wrote:
congrats on getting this guy. I will now own two Pittsburgh jerseys (#86 being the other).

Best player that i've seen play at UGA since David Pollack and I think Jones is better. I think this is going to be a great match for you all.


Hopefully, their NFL careers aren't similar.
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CKSteeler


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woodley missed just as much time as Harrison, if not more. When he was on the field he was generally lethargic looking. He honestly looked like he almost could have slid in and played 3-4 DE. I think he weighed 280-290...that's [inappropriate/removed] ridiculous.

He is untradeable and almost uncuttable, and the team clearly has faith he'll return to form based on the restructuring they did.

People forget things quickly. Terrell Suggs was under similar scrutiny a few years back after some low production seasons. There were questions about his conditioning and work ethic. You don't give up on these guys because they are elite players.
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armsteeld


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CKSteeler wrote:
Woodley missed just as much time as Harrison, if not more. When he was on the field he was generally lethargic looking. He honestly looked like he almost could have slid in and played 3-4 DE. I think he weighed 280-290...that's [inappropriate/removed] ridiculous.

He is untradeable and almost uncuttable, and the team clearly has faith he'll return to form based on the restructuring they did.

People forget things quickly. Terrell Suggs was under similar scrutiny a few years back after some low production seasons. There were questions about his conditioning and work ethic. You don't give up on these guys because they are elite players.


Woodley has NEVER been Elite in my eyes. He gets hot at times but most of the time he runs cold. He is limited in his pass rushing moves and is not as stout against the run.
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CKSteeler


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Woodley runs cold at the start of seasons when he is out of shape. He prescribes to the Case Hampton system of playing himself into football shape.

When someone says a guy isn't stout against the run, it's hard to argue online. I can only say that I strongly disagree with that. Even at his worst, Woodley is a pretty effective run stuffer. He doesn't have the motor James Harrison did, so he isn't going to get the tackle stats. Most OLB's don't get the tackles Harrison did.

Woodley has the power to bullrush just about anyone and, yes, the SPEED to take the edge when he isn't closer to 300 than his playing weight.

The guy also has a knack for making plays in the clutch. Outside the weed issues, I see Woodley a lot like Holmes was. They were both clutch as [inappropriate/removed], but had major warts as professionals. Woodley had two sacks in his first 4 playoff games.

Again, just about everything being said about Woodley was being said about Suggs a few years back.
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grubs10


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So i was attempting to do some "research" on Jones' spinal stenosis because I have heard many people, especially in the draft forum on here (people with very limited knowledge on Jones' case in particular), say he will be forced to retire in the next five years or that they don't want to see their team allow someone to ruin their life after football.

I have also heard that there are many different types of spinal stenosis with some being more severe than others. Heck, I've even heard people say that some with this condition don't even know they have it until after their career or that it can even go undiagnosed entirely.

Here are two of the articles that I thought were interesting and I learned something. (I think)

http://www.austinchronicle.com/blogs/sports/2013-01-23/the-nfl-beat-spinal-stenosis/

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1552191-understanding-jarvis-jones-case-of-cervical-spinal-stenosis
(I know its bleacher report and I have as many issues with them as the next guy but it is featured on the LA Times website and much of the information coincided with everything else I read for the most part.)

From the First link:

The Austin Chronicle wrote:
The Chronicle caught up this week with Dr. Andrew Hecht, co-director of spine surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, spine surgical consultant for the New York Jets and New York Islanders, and a member of the NFL Brain and Spine Committee

......

According to Dr. Hecht, players with spinal stenosis are at increased risk of stingers. However, they are also at risk for a more serious condition called cervical cord neuropraxia. Dr. Hecht had much to say about cervical cord neuropraxia, but the main distinguishing difference in this condition and a stinger is the presence of these symptoms in multiple limbs; both arms, both legs, or an arm and a leg.

With all this said, Dr. Hecht was extremely clear about one thing. "Congenital spinal stenosis is not a contraindication of playing football."

In other words, you can play with it. Nothing about spinal stenosis indicates that you can't.

In fact, research shows that players with spinal stenosis are at no greater risk of devastating spinal cord injury than any other player with a normal-sized spinal canal. This flies in the face of what one could logically expect, but it is indeed the case.

"There's no warning shot for devastating spinal injuries," Hecht said. "Most of the reported cases of devastating spinal cord injuries did not have a heralding warning shot or episode."

....

But, this comes with a caveat. A caveat that Dr. Hecht calls a "relative contraindication." Players who suffer "multiple" instances of cervical cord neuropraxia will get freaked out.

The condition is anything but comfortable, and we have seen that players with the ailment generally decide that football is simply not worth it at some point.

While Dr. Hecht says that it goes against what the research and literature universally support, it just seems logical to expect that with each instance of neuropraxia, there may be an increased risk of a more serious spinal cord injury at some point.....


While it may say something that this Dr. Hecht works with the Jets and they passed on Jarvis despite a need, I think there is also a good chance that they just liked Milliner and Richardson enough that they didn't want to risk it. Especially since their QB situation indicates IMO that they have a couple years of rebuilding ahead of them and the likelihood that Jones will eventually have his career shortened by the condition.

The biggest thing to me was that there is no known connection at this time between spinal stenosis and the possibility for a paralyzing or life threatening injury. He did denote that there is a possibility that continuous instances of nueropraxia can lead to more threatening issues, but he basis that purely on logic and not on past examples.

From the second artticle:

Bleacher Report via the LA Times wrote:
Jones' saga started in 2009 when he played for USC (h/t Jordan Conn, ESPN The Magazine). Following a tackle during a game against the Oregon Ducks, Jones felt his shoulders go numb. He sat out the rest of the game and later received a diagnosis of a neck sprain.... the two-sided nature of Jones' symptoms concerned doctors, as stingers are generally limited to one side of the body.

To understand spinal stenosis, picture a vertical PVC pipe with a rope dangled down the center. The pipe represents the 33 vertebrae that make up the spine. Under normal conditions, each vertebra encircles the spinal cord—represented by the rope—thereby protecting it.

In spinal stenosis, one or more vertebrae encloses the spinal cord more tightly than usual. To put it another way, part of the PVC pipe is narrower than normal—or "stenotic."

Jones' case involves the fourth and fifth of seven cervical vertebrae—the vertebrae that make up the spine at the level of the neck—called C4 and C5 for short.

...

The smaller diameter of the PVC pipe in spinal stenosis means there is less room between the incredibly sensitive nerves of the spinal cord and the rock-hard vertebrae of the spine.

To make sense of why that smaller diameter matters, think back to the last time you hit your "funny bone." That isn't actually a bone. Rather, when you bump the inside of your elbow against, say, a table, you are actually pinching the ulnar nerve between the table and the humerus, or the bone of the upper arm.

Now, apply that sensation to the entire body, but instead of that "funny" feeling, make it paralysis instead. Scary, right? Unfortunately, that is what Jarvis Jones risks—theoretically, at least.

In 1997, Dr. Joseph Torg and colleagues demonstrated that cervical spinal stenosis likely increases the risk of developing cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN), a condition defined as temporary paralysis of two or more limbs for up to 48 hours (h/t Pub Med). Current theory states that in CCN, direct hits to the head or neck compress the spinal cord between two vertebrae, thereby interrupting its signaling and producing symptoms.

...

In short, cervical spinal stenosis predisposes to CCN, and those who have had one episode of CCN are likely to have another.

....

Though he [Jones] may not be at increased risk for permanent damage—at least as far as we know—the possibility of repeated injury cutting into playing time can scare teams from drafting him at a high position.

Frankly, Jones' 2009 episode of shoulder numbness is probably not a coincidence. As mentioned, his spinal stenosis involves the C4 and C5 vertebrae, and the nerves that control sensation in the shoulder exit the spinal cord at the C3, C4 and C5 levels. In other words, the hit that started it all likely compressed those very nerves, and Jones' narrower-than-normal spinal canal may have contributed.

...

Jones is certainly the best linebacker prospect in this year's class. If a team decides that its linebacker needs outweigh the risk of injury determined by its medical staff, the decision to draft Jones at a high position becomes a no-brainer. After all, he has had no repeat symptoms since the 2009 episode....


This article displays the condition in a little bit more concerning manor. Unless they are misreporting Jarvis' injury at USC, the two-limb aspect of the original "stinger" injury means that he already has experienced nueropraxia. While they echo that neither spinal stenosis nor cervical cord nueropraxia lead to or indicate a predisposition to paralyzing or life threatening injuries, they do mention that an incident of CNN normally means it is more likely to happen again. And both mention that repeatative cases of CNN is very unpleasant and has lead many former players with the condition to "early" retirement.

It is important to note that, depending on the honesty of both Jones and the University of Georgia, that Jarvis hasn't had any episodes of CNN in the two years he spent at Georgia (nor any other time in his life to my knowledge). While it does seem likely that Jarvis won't go on to have a 10 to 12 year career, as long as he is honest with the team about his health going forward he should not be at any more of a risk for a career ending injury than the rest of the picks in this years first round. There is a the possibility that he could miss games or practices if he does suffer from CNN again since it involves a numbing of two or more limbs for up to 48 hours. The positive is that CNN does not appear to be something that would force him to miss large chunks of a season unless there are repetitive occurrences in which case he would most likely be encouraged to hang up his cleats.

Back to the first article:

The Austin Chronicle wrote:
So what does this mean for Jarvis Jones?

It means the same thing it meant for Michael Irvin, Sterling Sharpe, Marcus McNeill, and Chris Samuels. Pro Bowlers whose careers were ultimately cut short by the condition.

The most important part of that last sentence is "Pro Bowlers," however. When thinking back on the Dallas Cowboys championship runs of the 1990s, one may conjure up images of a black Mercedes SL-500 with gold trim and personalized Texas plates reading "PLY MKR."

In other words, former Cowboys WR Michael Irvin is remembered for many things, but never as "the player who had spinal stenosis."

When you have the opportunity to draft a "playmaker," you take it.


Overall, what I have found has alleviated some of my concern if only just because I understand it a little bit more. It makes me very happy for Jarvis that he is not a ticking time bomb who should stop playing now if he wants to enjoy life after football (atleast as much as anyone can after the physical abuse of playing linebacker). He clearly loves the game of football and has a passion for playing linebacker.
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FourThreeMafia


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

armsteeld wrote:
CKSteeler wrote:
Woodley missed just as much time as Harrison, if not more. When he was on the field he was generally lethargic looking. He honestly looked like he almost could have slid in and played 3-4 DE. I think he weighed 280-290...that's [inappropriate/removed] ridiculous.

He is untradeable and almost uncuttable, and the team clearly has faith he'll return to form based on the restructuring they did.

People forget things quickly. Terrell Suggs was under similar scrutiny a few years back after some low production seasons. There were questions about his conditioning and work ethic. You don't give up on these guys because they are elite players.


Woodley has NEVER been Elite in my eyes. He gets hot at times but most of the time he runs cold. He is limited in his pass rushing moves and is not as stout against the run.


I agree he has never been elite due to his inconsistency, but I disagree with this. He is very good against the run most of the time. He has his consistency issues there as well.

Aside from last year though, Woodley was a top 5 OLB in this league. Im getting a bit annoyed with how hot and cold he is, but as long as he doesnt repeat 2012, he is still one of the better OLBs in the league.
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FourThreeMafia


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

grubs10 wrote:
So i was attempting to do some "research" on Jones' spinal stenosis because I have heard many people, especially in the draft forum on here (people with very limited knowledge on Jones' case in particular), say he will be forced to retire in the next five years or that they don't want to see their team allow someone to ruin their life after football.

I have also heard that there are many different types of spinal stenosis with some being more severe than others. Heck, I've even heard people say that some with this condition don't even know they have it until after their career or that it can even go undiagnosed entirely.

Here are two of the articles that I thought were interesting and I learned something. (I think)

http://www.austinchronicle.com/blogs/sports/2013-01-23/the-nfl-beat-spinal-stenosis/

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1552191-understanding-jarvis-jones-case-of-cervical-spinal-stenosis
(I know its bleacher report and I have as many issues with them as the next guy but it is featured on the LA Times website and much of the information coincided with everything else I read for the most part.)

From the First link:

The Austin Chronicle wrote:
The Chronicle caught up this week with Dr. Andrew Hecht, co-director of spine surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, spine surgical consultant for the New York Jets and New York Islanders, and a member of the NFL Brain and Spine Committee

......

According to Dr. Hecht, players with spinal stenosis are at increased risk of stingers. However, they are also at risk for a more serious condition called cervical cord neuropraxia. Dr. Hecht had much to say about cervical cord neuropraxia, but the main distinguishing difference in this condition and a stinger is the presence of these symptoms in multiple limbs; both arms, both legs, or an arm and a leg.

With all this said, Dr. Hecht was extremely clear about one thing. "Congenital spinal stenosis is not a contraindication of playing football."

In other words, you can play with it. Nothing about spinal stenosis indicates that you can't.

In fact, research shows that players with spinal stenosis are at no greater risk of devastating spinal cord injury than any other player with a normal-sized spinal canal. This flies in the face of what one could logically expect, but it is indeed the case.

"There's no warning shot for devastating spinal injuries," Hecht said. "Most of the reported cases of devastating spinal cord injuries did not have a heralding warning shot or episode."

....

But, this comes with a caveat. A caveat that Dr. Hecht calls a "relative contraindication." Players who suffer "multiple" instances of cervical cord neuropraxia will get freaked out.

The condition is anything but comfortable, and we have seen that players with the ailment generally decide that football is simply not worth it at some point.

While Dr. Hecht says that it goes against what the research and literature universally support, it just seems logical to expect that with each instance of neuropraxia, there may be an increased risk of a more serious spinal cord injury at some point.....


While it may say something that this Dr. Hecht works with the Jets and they passed on Jarvis despite a need, I think there is also a good chance that they just liked Milliner and Richardson enough that they didn't want to risk it. Especially since their QB situation indicates IMO that they have a couple years of rebuilding ahead of them and the likelihood that Jones will eventually have his career shortened by the condition.

The biggest thing to me was that there is no known connection at this time between spinal stenosis and the possibility for a paralyzing or life threatening injury. He did denote that there is a possibility that continuous instances of nueropraxia can lead to more threatening issues, but he basis that purely on logic and not on past examples.

From the second artticle:

Bleacher Report via the LA Times wrote:
Jones' saga started in 2009 when he played for USC (h/t Jordan Conn, ESPN The Magazine). Following a tackle during a game against the Oregon Ducks, Jones felt his shoulders go numb. He sat out the rest of the game and later received a diagnosis of a neck sprain.... the two-sided nature of Jones' symptoms concerned doctors, as stingers are generally limited to one side of the body.

To understand spinal stenosis, picture a vertical PVC pipe with a rope dangled down the center. The pipe represents the 33 vertebrae that make up the spine. Under normal conditions, each vertebra encircles the spinal cord—represented by the rope—thereby protecting it.

In spinal stenosis, one or more vertebrae encloses the spinal cord more tightly than usual. To put it another way, part of the PVC pipe is narrower than normal—or "stenotic."

Jones' case involves the fourth and fifth of seven cervical vertebrae—the vertebrae that make up the spine at the level of the neck—called C4 and C5 for short.

...

The smaller diameter of the PVC pipe in spinal stenosis means there is less room between the incredibly sensitive nerves of the spinal cord and the rock-hard vertebrae of the spine.

To make sense of why that smaller diameter matters, think back to the last time you hit your "funny bone." That isn't actually a bone. Rather, when you bump the inside of your elbow against, say, a table, you are actually pinching the ulnar nerve between the table and the humerus, or the bone of the upper arm.

Now, apply that sensation to the entire body, but instead of that "funny" feeling, make it paralysis instead. Scary, right? Unfortunately, that is what Jarvis Jones risks—theoretically, at least.

In 1997, Dr. Joseph Torg and colleagues demonstrated that cervical spinal stenosis likely increases the risk of developing cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN), a condition defined as temporary paralysis of two or more limbs for up to 48 hours (h/t Pub Med). Current theory states that in CCN, direct hits to the head or neck compress the spinal cord between two vertebrae, thereby interrupting its signaling and producing symptoms.

...

In short, cervical spinal stenosis predisposes to CCN, and those who have had one episode of CCN are likely to have another.

....

Though he [Jones] may not be at increased risk for permanent damage—at least as far as we know—the possibility of repeated injury cutting into playing time can scare teams from drafting him at a high position.

Frankly, Jones' 2009 episode of shoulder numbness is probably not a coincidence. As mentioned, his spinal stenosis involves the C4 and C5 vertebrae, and the nerves that control sensation in the shoulder exit the spinal cord at the C3, C4 and C5 levels. In other words, the hit that started it all likely compressed those very nerves, and Jones' narrower-than-normal spinal canal may have contributed.

...

Jones is certainly the best linebacker prospect in this year's class. If a team decides that its linebacker needs outweigh the risk of injury determined by its medical staff, the decision to draft Jones at a high position becomes a no-brainer. After all, he has had no repeat symptoms since the 2009 episode....


This article displays the condition in a little bit more concerning manor. Unless they are misreporting Jarvis' injury at USC, the two-limb aspect of the original "stinger" injury means that he already has experienced nueropraxia. While they echo that neither spinal stenosis nor cervical cord nueropraxia lead to or indicate a predisposition to paralyzing or life threatening injuries, they do mention that an incident of CNN normally means it is more likely to happen again. And both mention that repeatative cases of CNN is very unpleasant and has lead many former players with the condition to "early" retirement.

It is important to note that, depending on the honesty of both Jones and the University of Georgia, that Jarvis hasn't had any episodes of CNN in the two years he spent at Georgia (nor any other time in his life to my knowledge). While it does seem likely that Jarvis won't go on to have a 10 to 12 year career, as long as he is honest with the team about his health going forward he should not be at any more of a risk for a career ending injury than the rest of the picks in this years first round. There is a the possibility that he could miss games or practices if he does suffer from CNN again since it involves a numbing of two or more limbs for up to 48 hours. The positive is that CNN does not appear to be something that would force him to miss large chunks of a season unless there are repetitive occurrences in which case he would most likely be encouraged to hang up his cleats.

Back to the first article:

The Austin Chronicle wrote:
So what does this mean for Jarvis Jones?

It means the same thing it meant for Michael Irvin, Sterling Sharpe, Marcus McNeill, and Chris Samuels. Pro Bowlers whose careers were ultimately cut short by the condition.

The most important part of that last sentence is "Pro Bowlers," however. When thinking back on the Dallas Cowboys championship runs of the 1990s, one may conjure up images of a black Mercedes SL-500 with gold trim and personalized Texas plates reading "PLY MKR."

In other words, former Cowboys WR Michael Irvin is remembered for many things, but never as "the player who had spinal stenosis."

When you have the opportunity to draft a "playmaker," you take it.


Overall, what I have found has alleviated some of my concern if only just because I understand it a little bit more. It makes me very happy for Jarvis that he is not a ticking time bomb who should stop playing now if he wants to enjoy life after football (atleast as much as anyone can after the physical abuse of playing linebacker). He clearly loves the game of football and has a passion for playing linebacker.


Great post and thanks for the research.

However, I dont think we wouldve drafted anyone in the first round who was a "ticking time bomb".

The ticking time bombs in this draft were Honey Badger (due to stupidity) and Mike Mauti (due to injuries). Both coudlve been top 50 players if not for their issues.

Daquan Bowers was another ticking time bomb a couple years back

I just didnt see that with Jarvis. He was diagnosed years ago, and still played 2 full seaosns at Georgia in the toughest conferece and was highly productive....and I dont even think that had anything to do with why he dropped..his workout was. Some teams may have been airing on the side of caution, but I dont think it was warranted.
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mosteelers


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know salaries at all.

What would you guys say if he has another season like last year or worse? Is it possible to let him go? Trade? I don't know about the numbers
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mosteelers wrote:
I don't know salaries at all.

What would you guys say if he has another season like last year or worse? Is it possible to let him go? Trade? I don't know about the numbers


Would be an ugly cap hit if we tried to dump him next season.

2015 would be the earliest IMO.

However, I think people are getting too ahead of themselves. Even if you dont love Woodley, he has still been very good for us most of his career. Lets give him another year before we start to say he doesnt have it anymore.
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