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CW21's 2013 Top 50 MLB Propsects (Posted On Page 5)
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CWood21


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:10 pm    Post subject: CW21's 2013 Top 50 MLB Propsects (Posted On Page 5) Reply with quote

2012 Edition

Year after year, we see organizations such as as Baseball America rank the top prospects in all of the minor leagues with varying levels of projecting future roles. These farm systems provide young, cost-controlled talent to supplement the big league club with the ever inflating cost of players to bring their talents to the ball club. Teams such as the Florida Marlins and Oakland Athletics rely heavily upon these types of players to be the heart and soul of their big league club. For every ying, there must be a yang and in baseball that is no different. Other big league clubs view the farm system has nothing more than trading chips to improve their big league club immediately. We see time and time again teams looking to strengthen their teams for a playoff push young, unproven talent in order to increase their odds of reaching the postseason. Either way, farm systems as a whole are a significant part of the workings of their parent ball clubs. But what do we base these prospects on? I'm glad you asked.

Arrow Ceiling - Obviously this is what the farm system is all about. Who can develop the player who will provide the most value to their big league club at a cheap price. Players who project to be impact players get overvalued over less impactful players.
Arrow Floor - On the opposite of upside is the floor, which measures what his lowest potential were to be if he were to bust as a prospect. Players who have higher floors, but lower ceilings tend to get undervalued on draft day but provide excellent organizational depth.
Arrow Estimated Time of Arrival - Another key component in comparing prospect is how soon they are to being at the big league level.
Arrow Production - While everyone loves to see their top prospects produce great numbers, they must always be held into check as stats can be deceiving especially if a prospect is being told to specifically work on a game. Players that have played better at a higher level tend to get valued higher.
Arrow Positional Value - Pretty self explanatory. Every position has a value and can be compared otherwise. Similar quality hitting prospects, but one plays a more valuable position tends to get the nod as a better prospect

This is my attempt at creating what I believe to be the Top 50 Prospects in baseball as of today. As a general rule of thumb, I'm going to use rookie eligibility as rules for this list. That means 130 PA or 50 IP outside of extended rosters. There are going to be differences in opinions and I'd love to hear your feedback.


Honorable Mentions Ordered By Last Name Alphabetically

Wilmer Flores [3B; New York Mets] - Wilmer came out in 2012 in a huge way when he posted a triple slash line of .311/.361/.494 at Double-A last year, virtually saving his stock. Reports still question his ability defensively, and some feel that he might be better off moving across the diamond to first base but that would dramatically hurt the value of his bat. Flores doesn't strike out much, which is always a positive but the larger question remains is whether or not he has enough power to play at the hot corner let alone first base. He's had a strong year to rebuild his stock, but he's probably not a big time prospect.

Luis Heredia [RHP; Pittsburgh Pirates] - Armed with a pitcher's frame at 6'6", 205 Luis Heredia had a strong showing especially as the Pirates pushed their 18 year old pitcher to their Low-A affiliate. The numbers weren't flashy, but he pitched to a shiny 2.71 ERA. His fastball sits in the low 90s, but really lacks the elite movement to make up for the average velocity. His curveball is what I'm most excited about as it shows some very nice 12-6 break, but still extremely inconsistent.

Justin Nicolino [LHP Miami Marlins] - Along with Jake Marisnick, Justin Nicolino was one of the notable prospects headed to Miami in the blockbuster that saw Jose Reyes and Josh Johnson wind up in Toronto. He's got a pitcher's body and clean mechanics. His fastball sits in the 89-91 range with some natural sink that cuts against RHH. His change up seems to be the better pitch going forward, but his curveball could be an above-average pitch as well.

Trevor Rosenthal [RHP; St. Louis Cardinals] - Trevor Rosenthal broke onto the scene out of the Cardinals bullpen in the last month of the season and into the playoffs. Armed with a fastball that touches 100 MPH out of the bullpen, he's got plenty of velocity. The Cardinals were so high on him he actually beat top pitching prospect, Shelby Miller, to the big leagues. He also possesses a curveball and a slider which helps him project as a potential #2 starter down the road. He's got a bright future in a pretty stacked Cardinals pitching farm hands.

Addison Russell [SS; Oakland Athletics] - Addison Russell really blew onto the scenes as he hit at least .310 in three different levels in his first season in the pros. The Athletics are so high on him that they've invited him to spring training despite just turning 19 years old. He doesn't possess any elite tools, but he's just a baseball player plain and simple



THE List
50.) Nick Franklin [SS/2B; Seattle Mariners]
49.) Alex Meyer [RHP; Minnesota Twins]
48.) Kevin Gausman [RHP; Baltimore Orioles]

47.) Gary Sanchez [C; New York Yankees]
46.) Rymer Liriano [OF; San Diego Padres]
45.) Max Fried [LHP; San Diego Padres]

44.) Jake Marisnick [OF; Miami Marlins]
43.) Mike Olt [3B; Texas Rangers]
42.) Julio Teheran [RHP; Atlanta Braves]

41.) A.J. Cole [RHP; Washington Nationals]
40.) Jake Odorizzi [RHP; Kansas City Royals]
39.) Noah Snydergaard [RHP; New York Mets]

38.) Anthony Rendon [3B; Washington Nationals]
37.) Jonathan Singleton [1B; Houston Astros]
36.) Taylor Guerrieri [RHP; Tampa Bay Rays]

35.) Albert Almora [OF; Chicago Cubs]
34.) Jorge Soler [OF; Chicago Cubs]
33.) Jackie Bradley Jr. [OF; Boston Red Sox]

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

16-50

50.) Nick Franklin [SS/2B; Seattle Mariners]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 296 PA, .240/.306/.412, 7 HR, 29 RBI, 0.35 B/KK (AAA)
ETA: 2013
Hit: 50/60
Power: 50/50
Arm: 40/40
Defense: 40/50
Speed: 50/50


Nick Franklin is one of the best middle infield prospects in all of the minor leagues with his ability to hit extremely well. He displays the ability to hit from both sides of the plate, but he's more comfortable on the left side of the plate. He should be able to hit .280 down the road. Power seems to outproduce what the body would show, and could have 15 HR power consistently at the big league level. Arm is a fringe average and one of the reasons I'm not completely convinced he is a shortstop at the next level. Defensively, he's got the chops but the average arm strength is probably going is going to limit him defensively. If you put a premium on defense, Nick Franklin probably isn't your shortstop of choice. He's got a bit above-average speed that helps him on his basepath. Overall, he's a very good prospect who isn't an elite prospect because of his lack of elite tools. He gets the most from his body and should be an above-average starting middle infielder for the Mariners.


49.) Alex Meyer [RHP; Minnesota Twins]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 18 GP (18 GS), 90 IP, 3.10 ERA, 3.4 K/BB (Low-A)
ETA: 2014
Fastball: 70/80
Slider: 60/60
Change-up: 30/40
Command/Control: 30/40


Alex Meyer is a BIG pitcher standing at 6'8", 220. He displays smooth mechanics while pitching that doesn't project to any significant arm issues. His fastball sits comfortably in the mid 90s and touches as high as 98 MPH. His four-seam fastball seems to have quite a bit more actin than his two-seam fastball. His slider while showing plus potential isn't consistent enough to call a true plus pitch at this point while it often shows two different types of sliders. His change up has improved drastically since his college days at Kentucky now projects as an average pitch and more than useable at the big league level. Unfortunately, he's only got average control and despite that significant heat that he possesses he doesn't project to be more than a #2 starter at the next level. Some project him as a closer when he gets to the big league level, and his command seem to improve when the Nationals bumped him up to High-A. He was the player dealt to the Twins when Denard Span was sent to the Nationals.


48.) Kevin Gausman [RHP; Baltimore Orioles]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 3 GP (3 GS), 9 IP, 6.00 ERA, 8 K/BB (High A)
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 60/70
Curveball: 30/40
Slider: 40/50
Change-up: 50/60
Command/Control: 40/55


Gausman, the former 4th overall pick in the 2012 MLB Draft, got a limited taste of pro ball for the Orioles. Drafted out of LSU, he's got a pitchers' body at 6'4" with plenty of room for growth into his body. His fastball sits in the mid-to-low 90s and touches as high as 97 MPH coming out of LSU. Right now, his change up is his best secondary pitch and comes in with excellent arm delivery and deception. He flashes an average curveball with decent 11-5 break. He also has a slider that shows solid two-plane break. He struggles a bit with control, but shows the potential to harness the command of his pitches and locate them well. Very quick, clean mechanics bodes well for his ability to stay healthy at the next level. Ultimately, I think he needs to decide between his curveball and his slider at the next level in order to maximize that third pitch.


47.) Gary Sanchez [C; New York Yankees]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 289 PA, .297/.353/.517, 13 HR, 56 RBI, 0.34 B/KK (Low-A)
ETA: 2014
Hit: 50/70
Power: 40/60
Arm: 60/60
Defense: 20/30
Speed: 40/30


Gary Sanchez can flat out hit. We're talking about a legit middle of the order bat that hits .300 and 25+ home run potential down the road. His bat would be more than plus at catcher, but becomes less valuable if he were to move to first base or designated hitter. Defensively, he's horrible to say the least and there are legitimate concerns about whether or not he can stay there defensively. He's got the arm to play there, but it seems like he's limited athletically that if he can't stick at catcher that first base is really the only other position that he can really play. He's going to hit a ton, but unfortunately concerns about his ability to stick behind the plate really hurts his draft stock.


46.) Rymer Liriano [OF; San Diego Padres]

Last Year's Rankings: 43
2012 Stats: 314 PA, .298/.360/.443, 5 HR, 41 RBI, 22 SB
ETA: 2015
Hit: 30/50
Power: 30/50
Arm: 50/60
Defense: 50/50
Speed: 60/50


Rymer Liriano is the first person from the 2012 list to show up on the 2013 list and he slipped three spots from his ranking last year. Not much has changed about Liriano as the same scouting report as before still rings true now. Right now, he looks more like a speedy leadoff hitter but scouts believe that his body matures he'll develop more power and that'll affect his speed. Defensively, he's playing centerfield but his defensive skills seem to play better in a corner outfielder spot. He probably is long term wise a corner outfielder, but he'll be given the chance to play in centerfield to maximize his offensive capabilities.


45.) Max Fried [LHP; San Diego Padres]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 10 GP (10 GS), 17.2 IP, 3.57 ERA, 2.83 K/BB
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 50/60
Curveball: 60/70
Change-up: 20/40
Command/Control: 40/60


One of the top prep arms in last year's draft, the Padres took him with the seventh overall pick in the 2012 MLB Draft. Armed with a fastball that sits in the low 90s right now, it should add a few more MPH as he continues to fill out his frame and has nice movement especially against right handed hitters. His curveball has scouts truly drooling. It's an absolute hammer and is already an out-pitch. It's got the chance to be one of the best curveballs in the game should he continue to progress. He hasn't really had to use his change up much in high school, so he'll need to continue to work on it to make it a useable pitch. He shows for the most part good control but will occasionally loose feel of his pitches and let them get away. He's got an extremely bright future and one of my favorite prospects in last year's draft. The Padres got themselves a good one.


44.) Jake Marisnick [OF; Miami Marlins]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 247 PA, .233/.286/.336, 2 HR, 15 RBI, 0.24 B/KK (AA)
ETA: 2014
Hit: 40/60
Power: 40/60
Arm: 50/60
Defense: 50/50
Speed: 50/50


Jake Marisnick, another one of the headliners of the deal that sent Jose Reyes to Toronto, is a legitimate five tool talent centerfielder with legitimate 25 HR, 25 SB potential. Shows a nice hit tool, but hasn't really put it all together just yet. Pitch recognition is improving but still needs some work. Has plus-plus bat speed that generates some serious pop. His body has the room to fill out more and develop more power potential down the road. Has above-average arm strength and should continue to get stronger as his body continues to fill out. Average defensively in centerfielder as he makes strong reads and jumps on the ball after it leaves the bat. Should be able to stay in center defensively, but has the ability to play any of the outfield spots at a high level. Above-average runner who has the potential to steal 25+ bases yearly. He was highly sought after when the Marlins were talking to the Blue Jays and it was believed that either he or Anthony Gose were going to be the headliner of the deal.


43.) Mike Olt [3B; Texas Rangers]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 420 PA, .288/.398/.579, 28 HR, 82 RBI, 0.60 B/KK (AA)
ETA: 2013
Hit: 40/50
Power: 60/70
Arm: 60/60
Defense: 60/60
Speed: 40/30


Had it not been for another prospect named Oscar Taveras, Mike Olt would have been hands down the best prospect in the Texas League last year. Overall, shows a very good hit tool and does a great job at taking walks. His strikeout rates are a bit high, and you'd like to see him work on that. Shows plus to plus-plus power especially out of a third baseman and probably hits 25+ home runs at the big league level. Defensively, he's extremely smooth as a former shortstop with soft hands and a strong throwing arm capable of making every throw across the diamond. On the basepaths, he's average right now but as he ages he'll probably move to below-average. The Rangers gave him a brief taste of the big leagues last year, and he'll be given a chance to make the big league club this year but he'll likely have to win the first base job since Adrian Beltre doesn't appear ready to give up third base any time soon. The Rangers have done a great job of developing infield prospects the last several years.


42.) Julio Teheran [RHP; Atlanta Braves]

Last Year's Rankings: 5th
2012 Stats: 26 GP (26 GS), 131.0 IP, 5.08 ERA, 2.26 K/BB (AAA)
ETA: 2013
Fastball: 50/60
Curveball: 40/50
Change-up: 60/70
Command/Control: 50/60


Julio Teheran took a MASSIVE drop in the rankings this year due to a lackluster year. You can argue he as a product of hype, but he failed to make the big league club out of spring training and the entire season tumbled out of control. He doesn't posses a great fastball but it's got some decent movement. His curveball isn't really anything special but it's got some nice break to it. His change up is arguably the best one in all of the minor leagues with the same arm action as his fastball. He shows good control, and should develop into a lower end #2 or higher end #3 at the big league level. His stock is starting to readjust itself after getting overvalued last offseason.

41.) A.J. Cole [RHP; Washington Nationals]

Last Year's Rankings: 41st
2012 Stats: 19 GP (19 GS), 95.2 IP, 2.07 ERA, 5.37 K/BB (Low-A)
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 60/70
Curveball: 30/60
Change-up: 30/50
Command/Control: 40/60


A.J. Cole was a guy I really liked in the 2010 draft and was hoping the Cardinals would select this prep right hander. He's got good size with plenty of room to add weight to his frame to help his durability as well as potentially add more velocity to his fastball that already sits in the mid 90s. He shows a nice curveball but is constantly tinkering with grip, so he has yet to consistently show the plus curveball that he's shown at times. It gets a bit loopy at the times, and doesn't always have the consistent hard break. He's shown a feel for the change-up, but like most young pitchers it's still a relatively undeveloped pitch. A.J. Cole was dealt to the Athletics in the deal that saw Gio Gonzalez land in D.C., but the Nationals thought so highly of him that they worked out a three-team deal with Oakland and Seattle that sent Michael Morse to Seattle and returned Cole to the Nationals organization. He's got the potential to develop into a front of the rotation starter, but needs quite a bit of work.


40.) Jake Odorizzi [RHP; Tampa Bay Rays]

Last Year's Rankings: 45th
2012 Stats: 19 GP (18 GS), 107.1 IP, 2.93 ERA, 2.20 K/BB (AAA)
ETA: 2013
Fastball: 40/50
Curveball: 40/50
Slider: 40/40
Change-up: 30/40
Command/Control: 50/60


Jake Odorizzi is becoming a stalwart on these lists, and it's because he's fairly projectable. He's got decent, but not great size for a pitcher. His fastball sits in the low-to-mid 90s, but due to his smooth mechanics it looks like it is coming out a lot faster than it actually is. His curveball is his best offspeed pitch and the most likely to become an above-average pitch. There is a tough time separating the cutter and slider, but both appear to be more of an average pitch even if he were to consistently harness it. His change up is an average pitch, and probably doesn't have a whole lot of room for improvement. He doesn't posses the upside of other arms on this list, but the fact that he's got four useable pitches and extremely smooth mechanics means he's a pretty safe bet to be a decent middle of the rotation starter.


39.) Noah Snydergaard [RHP; New York Mets]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 27 GP (19 GS), 103.2 IP, 2.60 ERA, 3.94 K/BB (Low-A)
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 60/70
Curveball: 50/60
Change-up: 30/50
Command/Control: 30/50


Noah Snydergaard already has an MLB pitcher's body, but he's also got room on his frame to add more weight. His fastball sits in the mid 90s, but touches the high 90s and occasionally even triple digits. Because of the downward plane he can generate, his fastball looks like a legit plus to borderline plus-plus pitch. Really like his curveball with it's hard snapping break. Looks like another out pitch for him at the big league level. Shows good feel for a change-up, but still largely undeveloped. Needs to be forced to use that pitch more often and could become an above-average pitch. Has smooth, simple mechanics which doesn't cause any major injury concerns and helps project to good control projections down the road. Should settle in nicely as the #2 prospect in between Zach Wheeler and Matt Harvey in a few years.


38.) Anthony Rendon [3B; Washington Nationals]

Last Year's Rankings: 18th
2012 Stats: 82 PA, .162/.305/.368, 3 HR, 3 RBI (AA)
ETA: 2014
Hit: 50/70
Power: 40/50
Arm: 50/50
Defense: 60/60
Speed: 40/40


Anthony Rendon is very naturally a gifted hitter, who could hit .300 consistently at the big league level. He's got above-average power, but projects more as gap power than true raw power like Mike Olt posseses. Defensively, he looks the part of an MLB 3Bman and has enough arm to make all the throws. Won't ever be confused with Scott Rolen out there but should be an above-average third baseman defensively. He's an average base runner and not a burner by any means on the basepath nor a liability. You could make an argument for Mike Olt here instead of Anthony Rendon and I wouldn't fight you on it, but I remain optimistic on Rendon's ability to stay healthy and develop into the hitter I saw when he was coming out of Rice.


37.) Jonathan Singleton [1B; Houston Astros]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 555 PA, .284/.396./.497, 21 HR, 79 RBI (AA)
ETA: 2013
Hit: 50/60
Power: 60/60
Arm: 40/40
Defense: 40/40
Speed: 30/20


Jonathan Singleton is one of the best first base prospects in the minor leagues along with Matt Adams of the Cardinals. He projects as middle of the order bat, and with the Astros moving to the American League could move into that designated hitter spot and hold it down for the next decade. He looks like a pretty good hitter who should be able to hold a .280 batting average consistently, and displays plus power that should get close to 30 home runs a year. Defensively, he's limited to first base but doesn't always use proper technique though. The designated hitter role is probably his ideal spot, especially if the Astros keep Brett Wallace at first base. On the basepaths, he's below-average right now and there are concerns he could clog the basepath. Putting him on your roster, you're asking for the bat but have to put up with the average defense and poor base running.


36.) Taylor Guerrieri [RHP; Tampa Bay Rays]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 12 GP (12 GS), 52 IP, 0.87 ERA, 9 K/BB (SS)
ETA: 2016
Fastball: 60/70
Curveball: 60/70
Change-up: 30/50
Command/Control: 50/70


This is probably my most aggressive ranking of the entire list, but I love what this kid brings to the table. His fastball currently sits in the lower 90s, but I think it'll jump to sit consistently in the mid 90s in a few years. His two-seam fastball has a lot of natural sink and induces a ton of groundballs. The movement makes it a true plus pitch. For as good as the fastball is, his curveball is probably even better right now. A true wipeout pitch that was just too advance for the league he was in this year. Shows a good feel for his change-up, but needs to throw more to harness it. Shows good control especially for a young pitcher, and should be a really good pitcher control wise. Very smooth in terms of mechanics. I really hate making lofty comparisons in youngsters, but I see a bit of a shorter Roy Halladay in him.


35.) Albert Almora [OF; Chicago Cubs]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 65 PA, .292/.292/.446, 1 HR, 9 RBI (SS)
ETA: 2016
Hit: 40/70
Power: 30/50
Arm: 50/60
Defense: 60/70
Speed: 50/50


Albert Almora, the first round pick of the Chicago Cubs in this most recent MLB draft, had a solid debut in the short season A ball. He showed an advance hitting tool, but his walk rate left a LOT to be desired. If there is any solace, it was in a limited sample size. Right now, he has below-average power but it could approach slightly above-average power when he fills his frame out. Defensively, he looks the part of an MLB centerfielder. He's got the arm to make all the throws that are required out of a centerfielder. He's got above-average speed, but his body type probably won't rob him of his athleticism. He could be a 15 HR/15 SB centerfield prospect in a few years, and hold down the position for the next decade for the Cubs.



34.) Jorge Soler [OF; Chicago Cubs]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 88 PA, .338/.398/.513, 3 HR, 15 RBI, 4 SB (Low-A)
ETA: 2016
Hit: 30/50
Power: 50/70
Arm: 60/60
Defense: 50/60
Speed: 50/50


I had a hard time distinguishing Almora from Soler, but ultimately Soler's upside ended up winning out for me. Jorge Soler looks like a middle of the order bat that will stick in right field. I think Soler could develop into a Justin Upton player that hits .280 consistently at the big league level with 25+ home run power. He absolutely plays the part of a right fielder with good instincts and a strong arm. He's even an above-average runner. While all that upside is present, he also possesses a ton of risk given the amount of teaching that needs to be given. The Cubs have a pair of bright, young outfielders but only time will tell if they manage to live up to the hype and make it to the big leagues together.


33.) Jackie Bradley Jr. [OF; Boston Red Sox]

Last Year's Rankings:
2012 Stats: 271 PA, .275/.376/.441, 6 HR, 29 RBI, 8 SB (AA)
ETA: 2014
Hit: 50/70
Power: 40/50
Arm: 50/50
Defense: 70/70
Speed: 70/70


Jackie Bradley lands on the list ahead of the other two Cubs outfielders prospect simply because he's much closer to the big leagues. I think he could get a taste of the big leagues mid-2014 should he continue to progress. He's got a comparison to Jacoby Ellsbury, and that seems pretty accurate. Should hit around .300 consistently at the big league level, and has surprising pop for a guy his size. Defensively, he's got the instincts and the ability to read the ball of the bat for an MLB centerfielder. Although, his arm is only average in centerfield and might not be able to make all the throws to get runners out. He's got the speed on the basepaths to make life miserable for pitchers. I think he could easily be a 4 WAR centerfielder when he makes it to the big leagues.
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CWood21


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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green24


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yay. I will be following this thread.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking forward to this thread as well. Heredia was the youngest player in the New York-Penn League and did pretty well. He's still growing into his body. He is one of the prospects that I will definitely keep my eye on this summer in the minors.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interested to see where Bauer and Lindor are ranked....don't think the Indians have any others close to top 50 status
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will definately be following. Should be some good discussion.

You are a good bit higher on Nicolino than I am (in the 75 range for me). I don't think Nicolino's stuff will play as well at higher levels. Pretty much spot on with my opinion of Russell, Flores, and Heredia, though. I honestly thought Rosenthal had lost his prospect eligibility, so I hadn't even ranked him.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

50.) Nick Franklin [SS/2B; Seattle Mariners]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 296 PA, .240/.306/.412, 7 HR, 29 RBI, 0.35 B/KK (AAA)
ETA: 2013
Hit: 50/60
Power: 50/50
Arm: 40/40
Defense: 40/50
Speed: 50/50


Nick Franklin is one of the best middle infield prospects in all of the minor leagues with his ability to hit extremely well. He displays the ability to hit from both sides of the plate, but he's more comfortable on the left side of the plate. He should be able to hit .280 down the road. Power seems to outproduce what the body would show, and could have 15 HR power consistently at the big league level. Arm is a fringe average and one of the reasons I'm not completely convinced he is a shortstop at the next level. Defensively, he's got the chops but the average arm strength is probably going is going to limit him defensively. If you put a premium on defense, Nick Franklin probably isn't your shortstop of choice. He's got a bit above-average speed that helps him on his basepath. Overall, he's a very good prospect who isn't an elite prospect because of his lack of elite tools. He gets the most from his body and should be an above-average starting middle infielder for the Mariners.


49.) Alex Meyer [RHP; Minnesota Twins]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 18 GP (18 GS), 90 IP, 3.10 ERA, 3.4 K/BB (Low-A)
ETA: 2014
Fastball: 70/80
Slider: 60/60
Change-up: 30/40
Command/Control: 30/40


Alex Meyer is a BIG pitcher standing at 6'8", 220. He displays smooth mechanics while pitching that doesn't project to any significant arm issues. His fastball sits comfortably in the mid 90s and touches as high as 98 MPH. His four-seam fastball seems to have quite a bit more actin than his two-seam fastball. His slider while showing plus potential isn't consistent enough to call a true plus pitch at this point while it often shows two different types of sliders. His change up has improved drastically since his college days at Kentucky now projects as an average pitch and more than useable at the big league level. Unfortunately, he's only got average control and despite that significant heat that he possesses he doesn't project to be more than a #2 starter at the next level. Some project him as a closer when he gets to the big league level, and his command seem to improve when the Nationals bumped him up to High-A. He was the player dealt to the Twins when Denard Span was sent to the Nationals.


48.) Kevin Gausman [RHP; Baltimore Orioles]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 3 GP (3 GS), 9 IP, 6.00 ERA, 8 K/BB (High A)
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 60/70
Curveball: 30/40
Slider: 40/50
Change-up: 50/60
Command/Control: 40/55


Gausman, the former 4th overall pick in the 2012 MLB Draft, got a limited taste of pro ball for the Orioles. Drafted out of LSU, he's got a pitchers' body at 6'4" with plenty of room for growth into his body. His fastball sits in the mid-to-low 90s and touches as high as 97 MPH coming out of LSU. Right now, his change up is his best secondary pitch and comes in with excellent arm delivery and deception. He flashes an average curveball with decent 11-5 break. He also has a slider that shows solid two-plane break. He struggles a bit with control, but shows the potential to harness the command of his pitches and locate them well. Very quick, clean mechanics bodes well for his ability to stay healthy at the next level. Ultimately, I think he needs to decide between his curveball and his slider at the next level in order to maximize that third pitch.
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redsoxsuck05


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder if Mason Williams or Gary Sanchez makes the list. I think Mason's more likely.
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JammerHammer21


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

redsoxsuck05 wrote:
I wonder if Mason Williams or Gary Sanchez makes the list. I think Mason's more likely.


I think Mason could make the mid 30s, maybe Sanchez in the next few (but his D is so bad that he might not).
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keysersoze3421


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As most posters will be doing for their own squads, I shall monitor for Red Sox names (and generally too). I am predicting Bogaerts in the top 20, Bradley in the top 30, and Barnes in the top 40.
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keysersoze3421


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

zelbell wrote:
Interested to see where Bauer and Lindor are ranked....don't think the Indians have any others close to top 50 status


My guess is both between 10 and 20.
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ramssuperbowl99


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disciplined of you to have Trevor Rosenthal outside the top 50, but I'd sneak him in over Nick Franklin.
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green24


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

keysersoze3421 wrote:
As most posters will be doing for their own squads, I shall monitor for Red Sox names (and generally too). I am predicting Bogaerts in the top 20, Bradley in the top 30, and Barnes in the top 40.

I will do the same for the Mets. Flores has already landed an HM. I think Syndergaard will land in the 25-35 range. Wheeler and d'Arnaud both have a good shot at making the top 10.
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CWood21


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

47.) Gary Sanchez [C; New York Yankees]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 289 PA, .297/.353/.517, 13 HR, 56 RBI, 0.34 B/KK (Low-A)
ETA: 2014
Hit: 50/70
Power: 40/60
Arm: 60/60
Defense: 20/30
Speed: 40/30


Gary Sanchez can flat out hit. We're talking about a legit middle of the order bat that hits .300 and 25+ home run potential down the road. His bat would be more than plus at catcher, but becomes less valuable if he were to move to first base or designated hitter. Defensively, he's horrible to say the least and there are legitimate concerns about whether or not he can stay there defensively. He's got the arm to play there, but it seems like he's limited athletically that if he can't stick at catcher that first base is really the only other position that he can really play. He's going to hit a ton, but unfortunately concerns about his ability to stick behind the plate really hurts his draft stock.


46.) Rymer Liriano [OF; San Diego Padres]

Last Year's Rankings: 43
2012 Stats: 314 PA, .298/.360/.443, 5 HR, 41 RBI, 22 SB
ETA: 2015
Hit: 30/50
Power: 30/50
Arm: 50/60
Defense: 50/50
Speed: 60/50


Rymer Liriano is the first person from the 2012 list to show up on the 2013 list and he slipped three spots from his ranking last year. Not much has changed about Liriano as the same scouting report as before still rings true now. Right now, he looks more like a speedy leadoff hitter but scouts believe that his body matures he'll develop more power and that'll affect his speed. Defensively, he's playing centerfield but his defensive skills seem to play better in a corner outfielder spot. He probably is long term wise a corner outfielder, but he'll be given the chance to play in centerfield to maximize his offensive capabilities.


45.) Max Fried [LHP; San Diego Padres]

Last Year's Rankings: Unranked
2012 Stats: 10 GP (10 GS), 17.2 IP, 3.57 ERA, 2.83 K/BB
ETA: 2015
Fastball: 50/60
Curveball: 60/70
Change-up: 20/40
Command/Control: 40/60


One of the top prep arms in last year's draft, the Padres took him with the seventh overall pick in the 2012 MLB Draft. Armed with a fastball that sits in the low 90s right now, it should add a few more MPH as he continues to fill out his frame and has nice movement especially against right handed hitters. His curveball has scouts truly drooling. It's an absolute hammer and is already an out-pitch. It's got the chance to be one of the best curveballs in the game should he continue to progress. He hasn't really had to use his change up much in high school, so he'll need to continue to work on it to make it a useable pitch. He shows for the most part good control but will occasionally loose feel of his pitches and let them get away. He's got an extremely bright future and one of my favorite prospects in last year's draft. The Padres got themselves a good one.
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