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imani


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hawkman98272 wrote:
Seattle quietly gave John Schneider a contract extension through 2016 last year. #winning


Love that. Biggest move of the offseason
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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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SoS


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tooki wrote:
New Real Rob Report!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKDd9ies5i8&feature=c4-overview&list=UUtblLfYa5QmFUndxGGdp24g


Real Rob: "You know the new guys gotta take the whole team out to eat?"

Michael Bennett: "I mean, we can go to McDonalds"


Laughing Laughing Laughing
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DudeWhat?? wrote:
If I am a starting QB and my back up is Kellen Clemens..i would only have one question...."Turn up for what?"
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SoS


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I feel like Kearse and Turbin are just the clowns of the team Laughing



Elated to see Schneider extended.
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DudeWhat?? wrote:
If I am a starting QB and my back up is Kellen Clemens..i would only have one question...."Turn up for what?"
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imani


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SoS wrote:
I feel like Kearse and Turbin are just the clowns of the team Laughing
.


You should have your sig sit em down for some lessons, just hard to watch sometimes.
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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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SoS


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

imani wrote:
SoS wrote:
I feel like Kearse and Turbin are just the clowns of the team Laughing
.


You should have your sig sit em down for some lessons, just hard to watch sometimes.


Oh man, Dizzy would make them dizzy.
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DudeWhat?? wrote:
If I am a starting QB and my back up is Kellen Clemens..i would only have one question...."Turn up for what?"
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imani


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rookies putting the wraps on their offseason program

http://www.seahawks.com/news/articles/article-1/Rookies-putting-the-wraps-on-their-offseason-program/76b07966-6d5c-468b-b7b1-918a7a010bc8

Quote:
The veterans might have left the building after last week’s minicamp, but the work and approach has only intensified this week for the Seahawks’ rookies as they move toward the final few days of their offseason program.

Friday’s workout included something head strength and conditioning coach Chris Carlisle calls “the triceps trifecta.”

“You do 20 pushups on a bench, 15 on a ball and then 10 on the ground,” Carlisle said. “When they’re done with their two sets of that, they can’t lift themselves off the ground.

“But they’re enjoying it. There’s a lot of teaching still going on with these young guys.”

That has been the focus of this extra time – four workouts this week and the final two on Monday and Tuesday.

“We’re going back through all our training and all our conditioning, which is different from the way some people do it,” said Carlisle, who was on coach Pete Carroll’s staff at USC and came to Seattle with him in 2010. “So we’re teaching this whole process about the Seahawks’ way – the way we think, the way we do things, the way we train.

“Like coach Carroll told me a long time ago, it’s all about preparing at the highest level so we can practice at the highest level so we can play at the highest level. And this is their preparation time. We’re preparing not only their bodies, we’re preparing their minds.”

The rookies are embracing “their” time.

“We’re all trying to work together and we all have the same goals,” said Jesse Williams, the 325-pound defensive tackle from Alabama who was selected in the fifth round of April’s NFL draft. “We’re working hard and trying to push each other to be the best we can.

“So it’s good to be on our own and work through everything ourselves.”

And the Seahawks’ way – which starts with Carroll, moves to his assistant coaches and ends up with the players – might not be the same way these rookies are used to doing things. While Williams arrived from Alabama, running back and second-round draft pick Christine Michael is from Texas A&M, defensive tackle and third-round pick Jordan Hill from Penn State and tackle and seventh-round pick Michael Bowie from Northeastern State in Oklahoma.

“For me, this has been really different,” Williams said. “Alabama is a really tough place to play. It’s super disciplined. Here things are different, starting with the tempo. But I feel comfortable coming in now and working out with everyone here.”

That’s another goal of these extra days for the rookies – getting them prepared for what will come when training camp practices begin on July 25.

“This is a great time,” Carlisle said. “We do our introductory course in teaching the rookies how we work here when they first come in after that rookie minicamp (in May). This is a good opportunity to re-teach it and get them ready to go into the book that we give them when they go home for the summer.

“It’s an acceleration of what they were doing, and it allows us to teach them some of the work we don’t do during minicamp but we’ll do during the offseason.”

It’s not just the veterans who have left the building, Carroll and his position coaches also have started their break. So these workouts are conducted by Carlisle and his assistants, Jamie Yanchar and Mondray Gee. But some things have not changed.

“I get to use coach Carroll’s words – Rule 1, Rule 2, Rule 3,” Carlisle said. “Teach them how we do things. Every time we can talk about it and bring it up again, we’re doing that. Coach Carroll says it. I say it. Same song, different drummer.”

Those rules, in case you haven’t been paying attention: Rule 1, Always protect the team; Rule 2, No whining, no complaining, no excuses; Rule 3, Be early. And the sooner the rookies adopt them as a way of their Seahawks life, the better.

“We’re just helping them understand how it is important and how this whole system works because we all are on the same page,” Carlisle said. “These rules apply not only to the football field, they apply to life. So you try to teach these kids how to do things right all the time
.”
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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

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Plush


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man this is going slow, but it's nice to read all these reports dude. thanks Very Happy
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imani


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://espn.go.com/blog/nfcwest/post/_/id/102933/snap-judgments-gone-from-san-francisco-49ers

The seahawks are returning the most player snaps in the NFC West at 87.4%. It's the highest "Percentage of 2012 Snaps Remaining on Roster".

We're actually returning the most OL snaps in the division @ 97.8% as well. Very promising for this unit going forward. Maybe the staff knows something about this group that what we don't for the time being.

Nice to finally see continuity coming out of an offseason for the first time. Definitely a good sign.
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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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SoS


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

imani wrote:
http://espn.go.com/blog/nfcwest/post/_/id/102933/snap-judgments-gone-from-san-francisco-49ers

The seahawks are returning the most player snaps in the NFC West at 87.4%. It's the highest "Percentage of 2012 Snaps Remaining on Roster".

We're actually returning the most OL snaps in the division @ 97.8% as well. Very promising for this unit going forward. Maybe the staff knows something about this group that what we don't for the time being.

Nice to finally see continuity coming out of an offseason for the first time. Definitely a good sign.


Sight for sore eyes.

Does that OLine % go down though if Carpenter and say Bailey are the starting guards?
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DudeWhat?? wrote:
If I am a starting QB and my back up is Kellen Clemens..i would only have one question...."Turn up for what?"
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imani


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SoS wrote:
imani wrote:
http://espn.go.com/blog/nfcwest/post/_/id/102933/snap-judgments-gone-from-san-francisco-49ers

The seahawks are returning the most player snaps in the NFC West at 87.4%. It's the highest "Percentage of 2012 Snaps Remaining on Roster".

We're actually returning the most OL snaps in the division @ 97.8% as well. Very promising for this unit going forward. Maybe the staff knows something about this group that what we don't for the time being.

Nice to finally see continuity coming out of an offseason for the first time. Definitely a good sign.


Sight for sore eyes.

Does that OLine % go down though if Carpenter and say Bailey are the starting guards?


Nope. Those would just be new snaps for next year. We're returning most of the players that actually were on the field last year. Something we've undoubtedly been the last in the division at doing since the JSPC era began.
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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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imani


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even with recent additions, Marshawn Lynch continues to lead the way



http://www.seahawks.com/news/articles/article-1/Even-with-recent-additions-Marshawn-Lynch-continues-to-lead-the-way/70ef2594-d738-4822-a71c-7239ec9301ef

Quote:
Just how far can the team’s Beast Mode back carry the team? When Lynch scored on a 2-yard run with 31 seconds to play against the Falcons in Atlanta in January, the Seahawks were that close to advancing to the NFC Championship game before losing by two points. And it was his 27-yard TD run midway through the fourth quarter the week before that gave the Seahawks their first lead in a wild-card playoff victory over the Washington Redskins.

In 2005, when Shaun Alexander led the NFL with a franchise-record 1,880 rushing yards, he averaged 5.1 yards on 370 carries. Last season, Lynch averaged 5.0 yards on 315 carries – and got more than just a little help from the rookie duo of Russell Wilson, who ran for more yards (489) than any quarterback in franchise history; and Robert Turbin, who added 354 yards.

You get the picture. Even with Wilson’s arrival last year and added maturation in the offense this offseason, as well as the addition of wide receiver Percy Harvin in a March trade with the Minnesota Vikings, the Seahawks will continue to lean on Lynch and the running game.

We’ve used – and reused – this snapshot from coach Pete Carroll’s Town Hall meeting at CenturyLink Field in May, but it’s worth repeating because it shows Carroll’s commitment to pounding opponents.

The question from one of the 500 fans at the meeting was about the offense veering more toward a passing attack after the Seahawks ran the ball a league-high 536 times last season?

“No,” was Carroll’s blunt and immediate response, which drew a rousing mixture of laughs and applause. “There are so many good things that come from running the football. It adds to the mentality of your team. It adds to the toughness of your football club that you present.

“Because you’re always going to play tough defense, hopefully. We’re always going to be tough in special teams. But you can be other than that on offense if you don’t run the football. We want to be a physical, aggressive, tough, get-after-you football team. And that’s where we can send the biggest message about that commitment to that.”


Just how deep is this commitment? In 2010, Carroll and general manager John Schneider worked a trade to obtain Lynch from the Buffalo Bills. In 2011, they selected Turbin in the fourth round of the NFL Draft because his style would allow the offense to continue being physical on those rare occasions when Lynch isn’t on the field. This spring, they used their top draft choice to select Christine Michael, another physical runner who fits the Seahawks’ get-after-you approach.

“We have some great talent at the running back position,” said Wilson, who used the zone-read to average 5.2 yards and score four rushing touchdowns on 94 carries. “It all starts with Marshawn Lynch and (fullback) Michael Robinson, obviously.

“And then you have Robert Turbin, who is an unbelievable guy to fill in. He’s a starting-caliber running back for sure who can catch the ball really well, runs the football really well. Very, very smart and great at (pass) protection. You have Christine Michael back there, too. The new guy, so it’s fun to have him back there. He’s very quick and can make a lot of plays.”

The Seahawks remain ready to use Lynch and all that he brings, but the club also is preparing to not overuse him. In addition to his career-high 315 carries last season, Lynch also played in all 16 regular-season games for the first time in his six NFL seasons and then had another 36 carries for 178 more yards in two playoff games.

Lynch’s take? “I just want to win,” he has said on several occasions.

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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012


Last edited by imani on Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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imani


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IS IT FOOTBALL SEASON YET?

Upcoming events

Quote:
Sunday, June 23:
Quarterback Russell Wilson hosts his Passing Academy in Richmond, Va. Spokane and Seattle camp dates with Wilson are coming next month.
Rookie running back Christine Michael and rookie tight end Luke Willson will be on hand for the Seahawks Family Football Fest at CenturyLink Field.
Monday, June 24:
The 16th annual Rookie Symposium starts up in Aurora, Ohio, where all 254 members of the 2013 NFL Draft class will report to learn about life in the NFL prior to training camp starting up in late July. AFC rookies are scheduled to report June 23-26 with NFC rookies following suit June 26-29.
Seahawks rookies are scheduled to workout at Virginia Mason Athletic Center.
Our resident reporter Clare Farnsworth will start up a well-deserved and hard-earned three-week vacation. But the football-content-starved fear not, as Farnsworth has graciously left us with a slew of stories previewing the upcoming season to run in his absence. First up is part one of his nine-part positional series with a look at the club’s quarterbacks – namely, second-year signal caller Russell Wilson.
Tuesday, June 25:
Seahawks rookies are scheduled to workout at VMAC.
Farnsworth’s positional series continues with a look at the running back group.
Wilson’s Passing Academy changes venues, as he hosts day one of his two-day camp in Raleigh, N.C.
Wednesday, June 26:
Seahawks rookies are scheduled for their final workout at VMAC before training camp – their pre-training-camp break begins shortly thereafter.
Farnsworth will highlight the club’s wide receivers in his positional series.
Wilson’s Passing Academy continues in Raleigh, N.C.
Thursday, June 27:
Middle linebacker Bobby Wagner celebrates his 23rd birthday. Be sure to wish last year’s AP Defensive Rookie of the Year runner-up a happy birthday on Twitter @Bwagz54.
The first of nine Gatorade Junior Training Camps takes place at Cedar River Park in Renton, Wash.
Farnsworth will take a break from the positional series on this “Throwback Thursday” – chronicling cornerback Richard Sherman’s time as a track star at Dominguez High School in Compton, Calif.
Friday, June 28:
Free safety Earl Thomas kicks off his football camp for kids in Orange, Texas.
Second-year cornerback DeShawn Shead salutes his 25th birthday – you can wish Shead happy-quarter-of-a-century on Twitter @dshead24.
Farnsworth’s positional series kicks back up with a look at the team’s tight ends.
Saturday, June 29:
Thomas’ camp continues in Texas, Wilson’s Passing Academy makes it way to Madison, Wis. and defensive end Cliff Avril hosts his inaugural youth football camp in Green Cove Springs, Fla.
Kicker Steven Hauschka celebrates his 28th birthday.

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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Full Richard Sherman breakdown. An Amazing read



(Full Breakdown in Link)
http://www.fieldgulls.com/nfl-commentary/2013/6/24/4445276/richard-sherman-seahawks-nfl

Quote:
Almost anyone who has watched a Hall of Famer in their prime can tell you about the moment when they realized just what they are seeing with their own eyes. This is the time when you're casually watching the game and suddenly, said player takes your attention by storm, with a movement or play so graceful it leaves your jaw hanging, your eyes blurred and your roommate wondering what the hell just happened from the sounds you just emitted.

Watching this unfold with previous knowledge of the game itself makes it even more shocking, epiphanous and spectacular, because you realize the improbability and absurdity of the act that just happened, as if all the rules and understanding you knew about the sport weren't broken, but bent to a greater extreme that you've never seen before. These moments are glorious but not exactly rare, with some many amazing players widely spread out between the eras, chances are all of us will see the moment with another particular player in our lifetime, if we haven't already.

Here's one for you. October 7, 2012. It's Week 5 in the NFL. Down by six, the Carolina Panthers are in full two-minute drill, possibly looking to round out the first half with points on the board. On the other side of the field, the Seattle Seahawks are comfortably playing prevent-defense, despite only holding a six-point shutout. Quarterback Cam Newton reads the coverage and spots to his right what appears to be a one-on-one matchup for his star wideout, Steve Smith.

As one of the quickest and most agile athletes that also evolved him into one of the most reliable, Smith was a guy that can beat a above-average cornerback to the outside curl for a 13 yard gain in his sleep, even at the age of 33. This was a reasonable, if not optimal opportunity, and one that Newton already succeeded in in previous trials. He knew where the play was going before he took the snap.

Lined up against Smith was a cornerback by the name of Richard Sherman, and somehow he also knew where the play was going before the snap as well. From the film he has spent analyzing over the past six days, Sherman understood the Panthers enough to make an educated guess as to what the play will be. The formation, to the personnel, to the down and distance and the positioning of the specific player he was up against (Smith) - in his eyes, everything added up. Left alone on an island with man coverage on the weakside, Sherman knows that there is a good chance he will be tested, and makes his move as the ball is snapped.

Instead of playing a traditional press or immediately starting to backpedal, he jabs forward with his first step; his right arm, fully outstretched, pushes Smith back, akin to a fencer lunging against their opponent for a point. Smith recoils slightly but isn't exactly unwavered, and his body, though unbalanced, has already started running towards Sherman's inside shoulder.

All the while, the cornerback casually shifts his gaze from Smith to Newton, anticipating the connection that will be made between wide receiver and cornerback. For the first five steps, not much happens; on the sixth however, Sherman suddenly breaks on his right foot and cuts from his inside shoulder to his outside, at the same time he turns his attention away from Newton to the ball he has just thrown. This slight re-adjustment is enough to throw Smith off his route, as Sherman is now physically angled in his face, and Smith is literally forced to block him out to create the space needed for the catch.

The task itself is successful, but alas, this extra effort, along with the slight recovery forced from the initial shove at the line has delayed Smith from Newton's initial pre-snap read. By the time he was ready to catch, the ball was already on the ground - like Sherman - whose arms are outstretched in a mix of success and appeal to the referees.

Now it's third and ten, and the home crowd's cheers are awkward and random because Smith is just standing there looking around without a first down to signal and on the televised feed Tim Meyers is chuckling to himself wondering why offensive pass interference isn't called at the same time he's doing a drive-by analysis at the slow-mo replay of the events that just transpired, reiterating to the audience with emphasis to "look at the stab move".

There was no markings or yellow circles. Most already knew who Steve Smith was, and more importantly, how good of a football player he is and the exceptional qualities he holds. He was your game changer, your first-down man, your 100+ catches, 1000+ yards, 10+ touchdowns per season play, and amazingly, he just got beat with a punch. I don't remember what other impressions I had made upon my first viewing of the play, but I do remember that my roommate asked me if I was all right a few seconds later.


Anyhow, that was the moment I, like many others around me, realized who Richard Sherman was. And that was in week 5 - when he hadn't really done a whole lot yet.

For the world of sports media, Richard Sherman is the next best thing. Only 25, he's already arguably the best cornerback in the league. On a team full of younger, perhaps more exciting stars and All-Pros, somehow he's the one that draws your focus, the one you write your headlines on (or he'll write them for you himself).

Hell, Richard Sherman's life story is as accessible as he is marketable - his background and growing up in the streets of early-90's Compton, his perseverance to avoid gang life and how it paid off when he was accepted to Stanford, making the All-American team for football and track in his freshman year, then switching from wide receiver to defensive back just two years later; how he managed to graduate on time with a Master's degree in between that time, how, even as a child, he'd make brash and bold predictions on his play before the game and somehow live up to it on the stat sheet. His motivation is driven by a complex brew of negativity, hunger and personal desires that makes up who he is now; his prolific comments against opposing players and teams both on and off the field; his unique athleticism and size and knowledge of the game and charitable acts and controversies and overall persona - all these things are just a Google search away...you probably know all of that already.

This piece isn't as much about the play of Sherman (which we've already analyzed many times) as it is about a fan's experience of him and more specifically, the context behind that. The idea is that, if for some reason you've managed to avoid watching him for the past two seasons, be it on the stands of CenturyLink Field or the screen of your television set, then you're about to see what some describe as "a robotic death vulture circling the secondary, waiting to feast upon the still beating hearts of the puss-cake wideouts who dare to dance where angels fear to tread".

And it may be tempting, at first, to brush away this slight exaggeration as being caught in the heat of the moment, as if this was the description people are forced to resort to when they describe their moment against Richard Sherman. But it also turns out to be literally true - even if it only lasts for a millisecond - though it takes multiple viewings and replays to see this truth, brief as it is, come to light.

David Foster Wallace once wrote that "Beauty is not the goal of competitive sports, but high-level sports are a prime venue for the expression of human beauty." Perhaps this statement is most fitting in the world of football, where amidst the connotations of war, animalistic passion, toughness, manliness and the difference between wins and losses lies the graceful choreography and beauty of the human body. Of course, most fans would confess that they watch football not for the latter reasons, and when they describe their love of the game chances are they are talking about a classiness and grandeur that I still can't define.

One might attribute this towards wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald, who, like Sherman, is arguably the best in his position group and who, unlike Sherman, is a future Hall-of-Fame shoo-in with dozens of accolades and records in his name without a speck of controversy. If you are looking for class and a natural fluidness that is everything right with the NFL, look no further than Larry Fitzgerald, the pure epitome of a humble, honest, and inspirational sports figure that many aspire to become and follow. In the eyes of Richard Sherman, he may be all that - and then some; On the field, Fitzgerald marked himself as Sherman's equal and therefore, theoretically became his biggest and most dangerous threat, so much so that had both parties played on bigger marketed teams this hypothetical battle probably wouldn't be relegated to Fox's fifth slot in the broadcast rotation for the past two years.

Week 14's matchup on December 9, however, was the one that Sherman himself is waiting for.

Unlike many other receivers, Fitzgerald has faced - and beaten - Sherman multiple times, the first, of course, in the final game of 2011 when he hauled in nine passes for 143 yards, and again in the first game of 2012 when he had four catches for 63 yards. Both times the Seahawks lost, both times you can excuse their play as rusty, underachieving and forgivable. On the other hand, this game would've been the first Sherman has played with the home crowd, and his team had just cruised to a big overtime win in Chicago last week.

There's also the fact that Fitzgerald and the Cardinals have been free-falling after a 4-0 start. With quarterback problems plaguing the team again, he hasn't touched the 100+ receiving yards benchmark in a game for six weeks. Nevertheless, the hype is still there if one looks carefully. And, if Fitzgerald was comparatively the league's image of a hero, then Sherman might've been his arch-villain; the quiet consistency of a nine year veteran going up against the rapid, loud-mouth surprise of the season, and a matchup that was finally balanced physically and athletically for two players that consistently outmatched everyone else.

Coincidentally, this was the first game that the cornerback will play following the announcement that he, along with his teammate Brandon Browner, has tested positive for PEDs. Though he has not made an official statement to appeal, the bombshell has already made its mark: Browner had already begun serving his suspension, and the usually vocal Sherman was unusually quiet throughout the week. Indeed, if there was anything more to watch for outside of this climactic battle, it would be how this young man, whose name has already headlined the tickers far more times than the team he plays for, would react.

It is now roughly two hours before kickoff, and the 12th man is scattered, pocketed between the seats and funneling in and out of the stands. The weather is typical of an Sunday afternoon in Seattle: overcast, grey, and wet. Fitzgerald is easily recognizable as #11 in the Cardinals White and Red, with his free flowing dreads behind him slightly covering his name and two slashes of eye black on his face.

The routes he runs are crisp and clean, and he warms up lightly, quietly with a heavy concentration devoted entirely to the football. On the other side of the field is Sherman, who now dons a black balaclava that partially covers his mouth and head. He moves at a rapid, unwavering pace, alternating between stretches and jumps and jogs and sprints, all the while muttering statements and goals of what he will be doing, as if he was a monk constantly reiterating a prayer over and over again until it's set in his heart. This routine continues on until both teams are called back into the locker rooms for their introductions, and because the networks are not interested in outlining warmups for a 4PM EST game, most of the details still elude us; however, what we know is that when the both of them enter the field again, under the roar of the crowd, they aren't just players anymore.

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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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imani


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Q&A with Russell Wilson



http://hamptonroads.com/2013/06/qa-russell-wilson-seattle-seahawks-qb

Quote:
Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, who is from Richmond, stopped at William & Mary on Sunday night to work with young athletes at someone else's camp. He's in the midst of his own five-city Russell Wilson Passing Academy camp for inner-city kids.

Draped in a gray T-shirt and neon-green Seahawks shorts, Wilson preceded two other stars at the Nike-sponsored camp - the Indianapolis Colts' Andrew Luck appeared Monday and the Atlanta Falcons' Matt Ryan appears Tuesday.

Wilson was a rookie who, despite standing just 5-foot-10 and being drafted in the third round out of Wisconsin, led the Seahawks to an 11-5 record last year and a wildcard playoff victory in Washington.

His season ended the next week when Ryan's Falcons stunned Seattle in the final 30 seconds; Ryan completed two long passes that led to a 49-yard field goal and Atlanta's 30-28 victory.

Wilson took time after the camp session to speak with reporters about:

Playing this season with recent trade acquisition, and former Landstown High star, Percy Harvin:

"Percy's so talented, he's so explosive. He's a great football player and has a great mind in terms of the way he thinks and how he plays, he's so competitive. Just to be with him and watch how he practices, it's a great thing for our football team.

"I knew of him, we knew of each other, but now we're really, really close, just spending time with each other, talking to him, calling him on the phone, texting him, throwing the football with him. He's great, the way he works."

Getting over the playoff loss to Atlanta:

"It's one of those things, you respect Matt Ryan and the Atlanta Falcons and their ability to make plays. It was unfortunate we came up on the short side, but you learn from those lessons.

"You're almost devastated when the game ends. But when I walked back through the tunnel to get to the locker room, I realized that our future is very, very bright. We have to continue to push ourselves and not be satisfied."

Whether he's "arrived" and silenced doubters about his height after his Pro Bowl season:

"I think it's always gonna be with me. I don't know, maybe. We'll have to see. But I don't think I've arrived. I think I'm continuing to get there, getting closer and closer to where I want to go. But I'm not there yet."

Whether he'll expect to attempt more than just 25 passes a game this season:

"I'm expecting to do whatever it takes to win, whatever that means. I know the coaches definitely trust me and my ability to throw the football. We'll do whatever it takes to score as many points as we can - and definitely one more point than the opponent."

Seattle's status as an NFC title favorite rather than an upstart:

"Every game's a championship game. When we focus that way, get prepared that way - that this is it, you know, this is the last one, the biggest one - you get ready, you get amped up, you get that laser focus and you're ready to play. When we have that, we have this edge that's hard to beat."

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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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imani


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seahawks' personnel moves reflect success



http://espn.go.com/blog/nfcwest/post/_/id/102869/seahawks-personnel-moves-reflect-success

Quote:
A successful three-year run under general manager John Schneider has led to promotions in the Seattle Seahawks’ scouting department.

Tag Ribary goes from pro personnel director to overseeing team security, football video, facility and equipment departments, the team announced. Trent Kirchner replaces Ribary after serving as assistant pro personnel director. Dan Morgan, the former Carolina Panthers linebacker, goes from pro scout into Kirchner’s former job.

Four of the players Seattle drafted since Schneider’s arrival in 2010 have achieved Pro Bowl status. That figure ranks tied with Cincinnati for the NFL lead. Among the Pro Bowlers for Seattle: 2010 first-rounders Russell Okung and Earl Thomas, 2010 fifth-rounder Kam Chancellor and 2012 third-rounder Russell Wilson. Richard Sherman, a fifth-round choice in 2011, has earned All-Pro honors at cornerback.

On the pro side, Seattle acquired top contributors such as Marshawn Lynch and Chris Clemons at bargain prices. The team also recouped value for Aaron Curry, a disappointing first-round choice inherited from the Seahawks’ previous leadership. Most recently, Seattle acquired Percy Harvin by trade before signing Cliff Avril, among others, in free agency.

In other moves announced by the Seahawks, Josh Graff goes from scouting intern to national scout overseeing the Carolinas Region.

Jim Nagy joins the Seahawks as an area scout from the Kansas City Chiefs. Nagy replaces 22-year Seahawks scouting veteran Derrick Jensen. Jensen, who played for the Los Angeles Raiders in the 1980s, has been battling ALS. The team announced his departure during the 2013 draft and honored him by having him make the team’s final two selections.

These moves should promote continuity under Schneider, who has worked alongside coach Pete Carroll to overhaul the roster. The Seahawks have won a playoff game in two of their first three seasons together.

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wwhickok wrote:
I don't believe for one second that Seattle makes it out of their first playoff game.

Russell Wilson Fan since July 2012
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