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Pacific Pro Football League offers Alternative to College
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MookieMonster


Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 3508
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jrry32 wrote:
RollEagles wrote:
ramssuperbowl99 wrote:
THE DUKE wrote:
So after 3 years, what are the ones who think they are good enough for the NFL and aren't going to do? Or their ones who have career ending injuries? Now they have no education, and no future prospects.
Community college, trade school, coaching, etc.

It's better to be those guys with a little cash in your pocket than to be the guy who gets processed by Butch Jones or Saban. And it's really not that different than most kids who take joke classes and get a basically worthless degree in African-American studies, general studies, or whatever joke major your coach pushed you into (if you even are on track to graduate, which, for 40+% of athletes, isn't the case).

This is the only part of your argument I always disagree with. I agree that players should get compensated and especially should be allowed to make money off themselves.

But the argument that they are taking joke classes and get a worthless degree doesn't make sense.

They register for classes. They have every chance to pick the classes they want. They have the opportunity to major in whatever they want. If they miss out on the opportunity to get a worthwhile degree, that is on them. If a coach really pushes that, whatever. You don't have to listen to what major they are suggesting you take.

And the idea they don't have enough time also doesn't resonate with me. If someone wants to go to med school or law school or pursue any competitive graduate school degree, you're going to spend a lot of time in internships, research opportunities, extracurriculars, etc. And on top of all that, the players get tutors for free.

End of the day, these guys have every opportunity to make the most of their education. Failing to do so is a choice they make.


Not really. The choice is made for a lot of these guys. Not that the majority of them care.

What? No one is forcing them to major in General Studies. Would a coach advise a young guy that maybe majoring in Engineering and playing football is a tough combo? Definitely, but no one is forcing them to pick a certain major.
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jrry32


Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 69131
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MookieMonster wrote:
jrry32 wrote:
RollEagles wrote:
ramssuperbowl99 wrote:
THE DUKE wrote:
So after 3 years, what are the ones who think they are good enough for the NFL and aren't going to do? Or their ones who have career ending injuries? Now they have no education, and no future prospects.
Community college, trade school, coaching, etc.

It's better to be those guys with a little cash in your pocket than to be the guy who gets processed by Butch Jones or Saban. And it's really not that different than most kids who take joke classes and get a basically worthless degree in African-American studies, general studies, or whatever joke major your coach pushed you into (if you even are on track to graduate, which, for 40+% of athletes, isn't the case).

This is the only part of your argument I always disagree with. I agree that players should get compensated and especially should be allowed to make money off themselves.

But the argument that they are taking joke classes and get a worthless degree doesn't make sense.

They register for classes. They have every chance to pick the classes they want. They have the opportunity to major in whatever they want. If they miss out on the opportunity to get a worthwhile degree, that is on them. If a coach really pushes that, whatever. You don't have to listen to what major they are suggesting you take.

And the idea they don't have enough time also doesn't resonate with me. If someone wants to go to med school or law school or pursue any competitive graduate school degree, you're going to spend a lot of time in internships, research opportunities, extracurriculars, etc. And on top of all that, the players get tutors for free.

End of the day, these guys have every opportunity to make the most of their education. Failing to do so is a choice they make.


Not really. The choice is made for a lot of these guys. Not that the majority of them care.

What? No one is forcing them to major in General Studies. Would a coach advise a young guy that maybe majoring in Engineering and playing football is a tough combo? Definitely, but no one is forcing them to pick a certain major.


No, coaches aren't holding a gun to their head. But coaches and teams certainly push guys hard to take easy majors, go out of their way to discourage guys from taking difficult majors, and pressure professors (along with the administration) to give their athletes good grades.

The school and the coaching staff often treat the education as an inconvenience. Do you expect the kids to not do the same? These are their leaders. These are their surrogate family members.
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MookieMonster


Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 3508
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Completely disagree honestly. Many schools have people on the football staff who literally drop by players classes to make sure they're attending, thats not something you do if the classroom is an "inconvenience".

This is a myth, no one is hounding these guys to take General Studies as a major. Many athletes take hard majors such as Financing, Engineering, Kinesiology etc.

They can advise them all they want, at the end of the day the athlete makes the decision themselves and any good school/staff is going to support them.
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NewAge


Joined: 01 Sep 2014
Posts: 18418
Location: el ramster on the sig
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MookieMonster wrote:
Completely disagree honestly. Many schools have people on the football staff who literally drop by players classes to make sure they're attending, thats not something you do if the classroom is an "inconvenience".

This is a myth, no one is hounding these guys to take General Studies as a major. Many athletes take hard majors such as Financing, Engineering, Kinesiology etc.

They can advise them all they want, at the end of the day the athlete makes the decision themselves and any good school/staff is going to support them.

Sure, some do. But athletes have to reach a much lower academic standard to get accepted into schools and to compensate tend to gravitate towards easier majors/fields.
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RollEagles


Joined: 10 Jan 2012
Posts: 12274
Location: Washington, DC
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

These are all really lame excuses that you guys are making.

"Well the coaches advice them to take easy classes and bogus majors."

"Well the academic standards are lower for athletes."

What?

None of those are excuses to say that these guys can't make the most of their situation.

Guys who go for legitimate majors and strive to make the most of their education are celebrated. We talk about them as being ambitious individuals.

If a coach is going to a player and telling him to screw around and take easy classes, that's on them and says a lot about their character. But that still doesn't stop an athlete from making the choice for themselves to make the most of their circumstances.
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jrry32


Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 69131
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 1:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RollEagles wrote:
These are all really lame excuses that you guys are making.

"Well the coaches advice them to take easy classes and bogus majors."

"Well the academic standards are lower for athletes."

What?

None of those are excuses to say that these guys can't make the most of their situation.

Guys who go for legitimate majors and strive to make the most of their education are celebrated. We talk about them as being ambitious individuals.

If a coach is going to a player and telling him to screw around and take easy classes, that's on them and says a lot about their character. But that still doesn't stop an athlete from making the choice for themselves to make the most of their circumstances.


It's easy to sit here on your couch and judge people. The coaches have a ton of power over these kids. And many of these kids have a very tight connection to them. If the coaches push them one way and discourage them from going another, most are going to follow.

They push these kids into generic majors and then guide them to the easiest possible classes.(or the classes with favorable professors)

It's disappointing to see so many of you make excuses for this conduct. The system doesn't encourage these kids to care about their education or take it seriously. It treats education as an ends to a mean.

It's why I laugh at the people who try to claim scholarships are fair compensation.

MookieMonster wrote:
Completely disagree honestly. Many schools have people on the football staff who literally drop by players classes to make sure they're attending, thats not something you do if the classroom is an "inconvenience".

This is a myth, no one is hounding these guys to take General Studies as a major. Many athletes take hard majors such as Financing, Engineering, Kinesiology etc.

They can advise them all they want, at the end of the day the athlete makes the decision themselves and any good school/staff is going to support them.


Yes, it is. It serves three purposes. One, it allows them to monitor where their kids are. Two, it is about instilling discipline and following team rules. And three, it's about keeping their kids from failing due to lack of attendance. It's not about encouraging them to take school seriously. Laughing

I hate to burst your bubble, but there aren't a lot of good schools/staffs out there if that's your idea of them.
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ohiogenius


Joined: 11 Jul 2008
Posts: 5745
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 4:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its not merely the coaches nudging the players

Alot of times guys who take the BS majors and can spend more time towards football tend to get a leg up on playing positions.

Plus coaches favor the guy who never misses practice or stays afterwards (imagine you have to go study and cant stay)

Obviously most of these guys dont care but it is a system that benefits those who choose ball over education
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BwickBrownie wrote:
cortes02 wrote:
Would JPP fit in the 3-4??

Peace!!!

If you're referring to fingers on his glove, the answer is yes.
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Thelonebillsfan


Joined: 22 Jan 2009
Posts: 29450
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Won't happen, these leagues pop up all the time and die within 2-3 years because they have no money.

Likely colleges already pay the kids more than they'd make here. So while it's a temporary boon for 3* kids and the like, I don't think it'll have staying power.
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JammerHammer21


Joined: 27 Dec 2009
Posts: 39766
Location: Anywhere
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, they can make the choice to try, but a lot of these guys wouldn't stand a chance in many classes, especially at the upper levels of the majors. There are guys who are barely qualifying to get into these schools to start, so they need a lot of help to stay eligible.

It's easy to say the athlete should make their choice, but it's not really a choice if they would literally fail if they tried to do some majors, not even counting the extremely hard ones.
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Bohlmann20 (On The 95 Cleveland Browns Staff) wrote:
Lombardi - Isn't that the guy the trophy is named after? If so, top 3 coach of all time.

#JDI
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buno67


Joined: 15 Mar 2007
Posts: 40997
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only time this would make sense is if you are a stud 2year years removed from HS or a legit D2 or D3 player looking to go pro. Go to this league your 3rd year, get $50k, get prepped for the NFL, and turn your last year before the pros as preparation for the draft. It saves your body, preps you for pro offense/defense, and gives you money.

Like this would of been the ideal thing for leonard fournette or say a young stud QB.

That is the only situation I could see this league working. If you are a 5star stud, going to a big time program like tOSU, Bama, and etc make more sense.

I just don't see this league really being able to develop kids straight out of HS.

They should just make this into a legit minor system. The only players allowed to enter are the players that didn't get drafted. After each season, NFL teams have a minor league draft and they selected the guys who spent a year prepping.

I think it allows the guys who left school too early to keeping developing, allows them to get money and preps them for the league. If you can't catch on with a team after college and a year in this system. You arnt meant to be a pro player.
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ramssuperbowl99


Joined: 15 Apr 2005
Posts: 35257
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

buno67 wrote:
The only time this would make sense is if you are a stud 2year years removed from HS or a legit D2 or D3 player looking to go pro. Go to this league your 3rd year, get $50k, get prepped for the NFL, and turn your last year before the pros as preparation for the draft. It saves your body, preps you for pro offense/defense, and gives you money.

Like this would of been the ideal thing for leonard fournette or say a young stud QB.
Exactly. The value of going to college for someone like that is admission to school and exposure/a high level of competition to prove draft status. Colleges have nothing to offer players who are already in and have already shown enough to get drafted early.

Sam Darnold, Ed Oliver, Dexter Lawrence, those kind of guys should seriously consider this.
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buno67


Joined: 15 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramssuperbowl99 wrote:
buno67 wrote:
The only time this would make sense is if you are a stud 2year years removed from HS or a legit D2 or D3 player looking to go pro. Go to this league your 3rd year, get $50k, get prepped for the NFL, and turn your last year before the pros as preparation for the draft. It saves your body, preps you for pro offense/defense, and gives you money.

Like this would of been the ideal thing for leonard fournette or say a young stud QB.
Exactly. The value of going to college for someone like that is admission to school and exposure/a high level of competition to prove draft status. Colleges have nothing to offer players who are already in and have already shown enough to get drafted early.

Sam Darnold, Ed Oliver, Dexter Lawrence, those kind of guys should seriously consider this.
high level of competition, that I would question
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