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BRIAN DAWKINS RETIRING! (to be honored 9/30 vs NYG)
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thebriguy90


Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 37
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:22 am    Post subject: BRIAN DAWKINS RETIRING! (to be honored 9/30 vs NYG) Reply with quote

Quote:
http://www.rotoworld.com/player/nfl/709/brian-dawkins
Quote:
Free agent SS Brian Dawkins has announced his retirement from the NFL.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/04/23/brian-dawkins-retires-from-nfl/
Brian Dawkins wrote:
“The Lord has blessed me to play in the NFL for 16 years. I would like to thank the Eagles & the Broncos 4 believing In me. I would like 2 thank all my teammates & Coaches that I have been blessed 2 go to battle with. Along with u, the fans 4 helping make my career 1 that i have enjoyed tremendously. In other words. I am announcing my retirement from the NFL.”



---------------------------

*Update

http://twitter.com/#!/eaglesinsider

Quote:
Eagles will honor @briandawkins in front of fans on September 30, nationally televised game vs. NYG

Quote:
Dawkins will be at NovaCare for press conference Sat. at Noon.


-----------------------------

Current And Former Eagles React To Brian Dawkins' Retirement

Jeff Lurie wrote:
"Brian Dawkins is one of my all-time favorite players and one of the best to ever put on an Eagles uniform. On the field, in many ways, Brian re-invented the safety position. He had the speed and athleticism to line up against the game's best receivers, and was equally effective in the run game. His love for the game was infectious and he poured his entire heart and soul into everything he was doing from the moment he entered the stadium until he left. Everyone who ever watched Brian play saw that and it was impossible not to love that about him. He was one of the best leaders to ever play here. "


Brian Westbrook wrote:
Brian Dawkins is simply One of The Best Eagles Player to ever put on the jersey and The Best Man I have had the pleasure of playing with!


Quintin Mikell wrote:
"I couldn't have had a better role model, in terms of my life in the NFL ... He was the ultimate professional. When he went to battle, he brought everything he had."


Hugh Douglas wrote:
"If they got past LBs and the D-line, when they got to him there was gonna be hell to pay because he was already pissed they got that far."

"The game is gonna miss a guy like that."

"The thing I wish we could have done [for Dawk] ... is win a Super Bowl. If anybody ever deserved to win one, it was him."

Brian Dawkins!! Played hard every time even in practice!! #bestIeverplayedwith


http://twitter.com/#!/eaglesinsider

Quote:
Statement from Reid on Dawkins' retirement: “I have no doubt we’ll be celebrating his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame."


B-Dawk NFL Films Tribute


Quote:
Dawkins Avatar Tribute


jonu:....................EAtotheGLE:...........EF5-36-81:.............willy:



.............................




sunny:..................Phire:....................Remix:.....................LOLKK:



..............................





UK:.......................Nabbs....................E808........................Carebear



...............................




McNMcF.................bkb77...................JayAp07..................EaglesFly58High


...............................



Art






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TRUTH


Joined: 01 Dec 2004
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Location: Mechanicsburg, OH
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.footballsfuture.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=485384&start=1410

I just went mod on ur behind!
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eaglefreak123


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Come on guys B Dawk deserves his own thread after all that he has done for the team.
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Eagles_808


Joined: 12 Mar 2008
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Location: California
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eagles_808 wrote:
http://www.rotoworld.com/player/nfl/709/brian-dawkins

Quote:
Free agent SS Brian Dawkins has announced his retirement from the NFL.


http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/04/23/brian-dawkins-retires-from-nfl/

Quote:
“The Lord has blessed me to play in the NFL for 16 years. I would like to thank the Eagles & the Broncos 4 believing In me. I would like 2 thank all my teammates & Coaches that I have been blessed 2 go to battle with. Along with u, the fans 4 helping make my career 1 that i have enjoyed tremendously. In other words. I am announcing my retirement from the NFL.”



1 day contract FTW! Pray

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Hockey5djh


Joined: 08 Feb 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Worth its own thread IMO.

Also worth a re-read of this bad boy:

BatCountry! wrote:
Brian Dawkins: The Case for the Hall of Fame


The following is my argument for the future induction of Brian Dawkins into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. I feel that despite his unbelievable accomplishments on the field, outside of Philadelphia the pressure to place Dawkins in the Hall is not very strong. I hope my analysis can provide ample ammunition for Eagles fans and non-fans alike to justify the Hall of Fame resume of one of the greatest Eagles to ever put on pads.

Here we go!



*image courtesy of PhiladelphiaEagles.com



Part I: Career Interceptions

A cursory glance at Brian Dawkins' career would reveal an assumingly large problem on his Hall of Fame resume - his career interception total. Every Hall of Fame defensive back was a prolific ballhawk, and their career totals in this statistic are extremely impressive. The interception itself is often the defining statistic for defensive backs among casual fans, and year in and year out we see players being voted to the Pro Bowl based almost exclusively on their interception total that season. However I want to debunk the myth that Brian's relatively low total of career interceptions (34) should be a concern for his Hall entry.

Only 11 players who are ranked in the Top 20 in career defensive interceptions (giving advanced credit to Rod Woodson and Aeneus Williams) are Hall of Famers. Clearly, a player's career interception total is not the common denominator for Hall entrance among defensive backs. However, at the same time no current Hall of Fame defensive back has fewer than 40 career interceptions. Roger Wehrli ('69-'82), a career cornerback, has 40 and the safety with the fewest career picks is Jack Christiansen ('51-'58 ) with 46.

What this represents is that while Hall of Famers are not, and should not be, one dimensional players (unless they have displayed complete and historical dominance of a certain aspect of the game), they should undoubtedly be very good at the primary skills required for their position.

Yet, as with all statistics, the interception has evolved over time. The popularization of the 'shotgun' formation in the 1960s increased the number of pass attempts per game league-wide which created more balanced offensive attacks. Coaches enamored with the quick strike capability of a prolific passing offense called more ambitious, albeit risky, plays during this time period. The purpose of the passing game was to target vertical lanes down the field and gain a larger number of yards that could be gained consistently through the running game. Concurrently, defensive interception totals around the league were very high (comparatively) during this era.

In the 1980s, Bill Walsh's 'West Coast' offense and the evolution of the quarterback position began changing the game. This offense utilized a greater proportion of high percentage passes and punished aggressive blitzing schemes. Passing attempts in this type of offense were high, but the turnover ratio was much lower due to the shorter nature of the routes and multiple options granted to the quarterback.


* Statistics for this graph are presented on a spreadsheet at the end of the post

The success of the WCO and the proliferation of the Bill Walsh coaching tree around the league further impacted interception totals league wide. By the late 1990s and into the 2000s, the number of interceptions thrown per game (both teams combined) went down from an average of ~3 during the 60s and 70s to ~2, the current rate.

The purpose of this digression was to demonstrate how analysis of career interception totals should be adjusted for the current generation of players. Modern interceptions do not come as cheaply as they did in the earlier years of the NFL. In reason, modern defensive backs cannot be compared statistically to current Hall members.

As for Dawkins: Among active safeties Brian Dawkins is ranked 4th in the league in interceptions, behind only Darren Sharper, Sammy Knight, and Ed Reed. Among NFL safeties who began their careers after 1980, Brian is ranked 13th in career interceptions. BUT, if you take all those players since 1980 and eliminate every player that was not voted 1st team All-Pro more than once (much more a barometer of success than the Pro Bowl since it is voted on by the Associated Press - Dawkins made 4), Dawkins is ranked 6th in interceptions at safety behind only Ronnie Lott, Derron Cherry, Ed Reed, LeRoy Butler, and Joey Browner.



Part II: Revolutionizing the Safety Position

Brian Dawkins was the primary catalyst in the modern revolution of the safety position. Like Lawrence Taylor, who transformed outside linebacker from a read-and-react position to an aggressive attacking role, Brian Dawkins redefined the use of the NFL safety to that of an all-purpose playmaker. Not only did he breathe new life into a stagnant position, he re-tooled modern defensive coordinators with one of the most effective defensive weapons in recent football memory - the hybrid safety.

Brian is a rare player, not only with the coverage abilities of an cornerback and the power of linebacker, but the blitzing instincts of a rush end; much more effective than the one-dimensional 'rover' safeties of past generations due to his coverage skills, and even deadlier on the blitz due his speed and instincts. Brian's hybrid safety revolution granted defensive coordinators new tools to create havoc and confuse opposing offenses. Further, hybrid safeties have also taken new responsibilities in countering the infusion of more athletic tight ends to NFL offenses in the past decade. During his career, opposing quarterbacks and centers were forced to identify Dawkins' location prior to the snap - such adjustments in the past were almost always designated for linebackers. This was primarily due to Dawkins' starting position at the snap being the pre-determinant of the Eagles' blitz scheme for the majority of his career.

Evidence of Brian Dawkins' impact can be seen throughout the league today in the newest crop of impact players - the Troy Polamalus, the Adrian Wilsons, the LaRon Landrys. In high school, high profile athletes who would in the past be recruited for linebacker, running back, or cornerback, are signing letters of intent to play safety. College players like Taylor Mays, William Moore, Will Hill, Chad Jones, and Morgan Burnett look to continue this new tradition.

For years in the NFL, 'safety' was a positional designation defined by what a player could not do. Brian Dawkins repealed this label and created a new position defined by the fact that there was nothing they could not do.


*image courtesy of PhiladelphiaEagles.com



Part III: The Playmaker

I feel that there are certain statistics that have been underrated in the league for a long time, and the forced fumble is one of them. Short of the interception, the fumble is the only turnover-forcing play on defense. Turnovers change possessions and resultantly swing momentum in football games. For years the 'forced fumble' was not a recorded statistic in the NFL although the 'fumble recovery' was. I assume this was due to the difficultly on the official scorer's part in identifying who forced a fumble without the use of high-definition replay and multiple camera angles. Regardless, I feel that the forced fumble is a superior statistic to the fumble recovery since it is the catalyzing, intentional play which could lead to a possession change. The fumble recovery does demonstrate in-game awareness, presence around the ball, and in many cases athleticism, yet the forced fumble is still superior.

To continue my case on forced fumbles, among Brian Dawkins' most impressive statistics is his number of "disruptive plays" (interceptions + forced fumbles) throughout his career. In fact using this definition of 'disruptive', you could clearly make the case that Brian Dawkins has been one of, if not the most, disruptive defensive players in NFL history. For all players who began their careers after 1990, no NFL player has recorded more "disruptive plays" than Dawkins' 66. And if you go back further to 1980, the only players ahead of Dawkins are Hall of Famer Ronnie Lott and future Hall of Famer Rod Woodson.

Other accolades (edit, adjusted for full 2008 statistics):
Arrow The only player with 30+ INTs and 30+ FFs in his career.
Arrow 4-time 1st Team All-Pro (AP). Since 1980, Dawkins is one of only 4 NFL players to be voted 1st Team All-Pro as a safety 4 or more times in a career. The other three are Ronnie Lott (5x), LeRoy Butler (4x), and Darren Woodson (4x).
Arrow Shares the Eagles team record for most career interceptions with 34.
Arrow Has 106 career wins, most all-time for any Philadelphia Eagle, including 9 playoff wins.
Arrow Most forced fumbles among NFL defensive backs in history (32 - like sacks, difficult to prove numbers from past players before stat was recorded).
Arrow One of only 9 members of the NFL's 20/20 club - 20 sacks and 20 INTs in a career. Dawkins is one of the 4 defensive backs in the club.
Arrow Ranks 4th in most career sacks by a defensive back with 21.0.
Arrow Holds the Eagles team record for most games played as an Eagle with 183.
Arrow Leads all active defensive players in fumble recoveries with 16 so far in his career.
Arrow He is the only player in league history to record a sack, an INT, FR, and TD reception in a single game (vs. Hou. 9/29/02).



Conclusion:

What makes a Hall of Fame player?

Voters and fans alike have been asking this question since Canton's inaugural year. For some players their inclusion is unquestioned - the all time greats like Reggie White, Jim Brown, and Dan Marino. Yet there are other players that do not have such barrier-defying attention that are great, Hall of Fame players in their own right.

How do you quantify such greatness? I believe the best way to quantify a player's greatness in the ever-changing environment of the National Football League is through an objective comparison with other players in their era as well as a notation of the player's contribution and impact on the game. I believe my quantitative analysis of Brian Dawkins' career has provided ample proof of his uniqueness and singular accomplishments on the field that should merit him induction into the Hall of Fame. And most notably, in my objective analysis I have even dared to omit what possibly could be Brian's most important ticket to Canton - his heart and spirit on the field. As the heart and soul of one of the most consistently dominant defenses of his era, as well as the heart of soul of a legion of fans, Dawkins' impact extended well beyond the field. I sincerely hope that when the time comes, voters will properly respect the career of Brian Dawkins with a bust in Canton for posterity.

Outstanding 2007 interview of Brian Dawkins by Steve Sabol from NFL Films


* I tried my best to be as accurate as possible with all of my statistics, but I am human and god knows I make my mistakes! Pretty much all my information came from the sites listed below, but if I made any errors please let me know!

NFL Per Season League-Wide Interception Totals, 1961-2007


Sources:
http://www.pro-football-reference.com/
http://www.profootballhof.com/
http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com


http://www.footballsfuture.com/phpBB2/posting.php?mode=quote&p=5903432
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Eagles_808


Joined: 12 Mar 2008
Posts: 27814
Location: California
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://twitter.com/#!/caplannfl

Quote:
No exaggeration: Can't think of a Philadelphia athlete in my lifetime who was more universally liked here than Dawkins.

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thebriguy90


Joined: 21 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hockey5djh wrote:
Worth its own thread IMO.

Also worth a re-read of this bad boy:

BatCountry! wrote:
Brian Dawkins: The Case for the Hall of Fame


The following is my argument for the future induction of Brian Dawkins into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. I feel that despite his unbelievable accomplishments on the field, outside of Philadelphia the pressure to place Dawkins in the Hall is not very strong. I hope my analysis can provide ample ammunition for Eagles fans and non-fans alike to justify the Hall of Fame resume of one of the greatest Eagles to ever put on pads.

Here we go!



*image courtesy of PhiladelphiaEagles.com



Part I: Career Interceptions

A cursory glance at Brian Dawkins' career would reveal an assumingly large problem on his Hall of Fame resume - his career interception total. Every Hall of Fame defensive back was a prolific ballhawk, and their career totals in this statistic are extremely impressive. The interception itself is often the defining statistic for defensive backs among casual fans, and year in and year out we see players being voted to the Pro Bowl based almost exclusively on their interception total that season. However I want to debunk the myth that Brian's relatively low total of career interceptions (34) should be a concern for his Hall entry.

Only 11 players who are ranked in the Top 20 in career defensive interceptions (giving advanced credit to Rod Woodson and Aeneus Williams) are Hall of Famers. Clearly, a player's career interception total is not the common denominator for Hall entrance among defensive backs. However, at the same time no current Hall of Fame defensive back has fewer than 40 career interceptions. Roger Wehrli ('69-'82), a career cornerback, has 40 and the safety with the fewest career picks is Jack Christiansen ('51-'58 ) with 46.

What this represents is that while Hall of Famers are not, and should not be, one dimensional players (unless they have displayed complete and historical dominance of a certain aspect of the game), they should undoubtedly be very good at the primary skills required for their position.

Yet, as with all statistics, the interception has evolved over time. The popularization of the 'shotgun' formation in the 1960s increased the number of pass attempts per game league-wide which created more balanced offensive attacks. Coaches enamored with the quick strike capability of a prolific passing offense called more ambitious, albeit risky, plays during this time period. The purpose of the passing game was to target vertical lanes down the field and gain a larger number of yards that could be gained consistently through the running game. Concurrently, defensive interception totals around the league were very high (comparatively) during this era.

In the 1980s, Bill Walsh's 'West Coast' offense and the evolution of the quarterback position began changing the game. This offense utilized a greater proportion of high percentage passes and punished aggressive blitzing schemes. Passing attempts in this type of offense were high, but the turnover ratio was much lower due to the shorter nature of the routes and multiple options granted to the quarterback.


* Statistics for this graph are presented on a spreadsheet at the end of the post

The success of the WCO and the proliferation of the Bill Walsh coaching tree around the league further impacted interception totals league wide. By the late 1990s and into the 2000s, the number of interceptions thrown per game (both teams combined) went down from an average of ~3 during the 60s and 70s to ~2, the current rate.

The purpose of this digression was to demonstrate how analysis of career interception totals should be adjusted for the current generation of players. Modern interceptions do not come as cheaply as they did in the earlier years of the NFL. In reason, modern defensive backs cannot be compared statistically to current Hall members.

As for Dawkins: Among active safeties Brian Dawkins is ranked 4th in the league in interceptions, behind only Darren Sharper, Sammy Knight, and Ed Reed. Among NFL safeties who began their careers after 1980, Brian is ranked 13th in career interceptions. BUT, if you take all those players since 1980 and eliminate every player that was not voted 1st team All-Pro more than once (much more a barometer of success than the Pro Bowl since it is voted on by the Associated Press - Dawkins made 4), Dawkins is ranked 6th in interceptions at safety behind only Ronnie Lott, Derron Cherry, Ed Reed, LeRoy Butler, and Joey Browner.



Part II: Revolutionizing the Safety Position

Brian Dawkins was the primary catalyst in the modern revolution of the safety position. Like Lawrence Taylor, who transformed outside linebacker from a read-and-react position to an aggressive attacking role, Brian Dawkins redefined the use of the NFL safety to that of an all-purpose playmaker. Not only did he breathe new life into a stagnant position, he re-tooled modern defensive coordinators with one of the most effective defensive weapons in recent football memory - the hybrid safety.

Brian is a rare player, not only with the coverage abilities of an cornerback and the power of linebacker, but the blitzing instincts of a rush end; much more effective than the one-dimensional 'rover' safeties of past generations due to his coverage skills, and even deadlier on the blitz due his speed and instincts. Brian's hybrid safety revolution granted defensive coordinators new tools to create havoc and confuse opposing offenses. Further, hybrid safeties have also taken new responsibilities in countering the infusion of more athletic tight ends to NFL offenses in the past decade. During his career, opposing quarterbacks and centers were forced to identify Dawkins' location prior to the snap - such adjustments in the past were almost always designated for linebackers. This was primarily due to Dawkins' starting position at the snap being the pre-determinant of the Eagles' blitz scheme for the majority of his career.

Evidence of Brian Dawkins' impact can be seen throughout the league today in the newest crop of impact players - the Troy Polamalus, the Adrian Wilsons, the LaRon Landrys. In high school, high profile athletes who would in the past be recruited for linebacker, running back, or cornerback, are signing letters of intent to play safety. College players like Taylor Mays, William Moore, Will Hill, Chad Jones, and Morgan Burnett look to continue this new tradition.

For years in the NFL, 'safety' was a positional designation defined by what a player could not do. Brian Dawkins repealed this label and created a new position defined by the fact that there was nothing they could not do.


*image courtesy of PhiladelphiaEagles.com



Part III: The Playmaker

I feel that there are certain statistics that have been underrated in the league for a long time, and the forced fumble is one of them. Short of the interception, the fumble is the only turnover-forcing play on defense. Turnovers change possessions and resultantly swing momentum in football games. For years the 'forced fumble' was not a recorded statistic in the NFL although the 'fumble recovery' was. I assume this was due to the difficultly on the official scorer's part in identifying who forced a fumble without the use of high-definition replay and multiple camera angles. Regardless, I feel that the forced fumble is a superior statistic to the fumble recovery since it is the catalyzing, intentional play which could lead to a possession change. The fumble recovery does demonstrate in-game awareness, presence around the ball, and in many cases athleticism, yet the forced fumble is still superior.

To continue my case on forced fumbles, among Brian Dawkins' most impressive statistics is his number of "disruptive plays" (interceptions + forced fumbles) throughout his career. In fact using this definition of 'disruptive', you could clearly make the case that Brian Dawkins has been one of, if not the most, disruptive defensive players in NFL history. For all players who began their careers after 1990, no NFL player has recorded more "disruptive plays" than Dawkins' 66. And if you go back further to 1980, the only players ahead of Dawkins are Hall of Famer Ronnie Lott and future Hall of Famer Rod Woodson.

Other accolades (edit, adjusted for full 2008 statistics):
Arrow The only player with 30+ INTs and 30+ FFs in his career.
Arrow 4-time 1st Team All-Pro (AP). Since 1980, Dawkins is one of only 4 NFL players to be voted 1st Team All-Pro as a safety 4 or more times in a career. The other three are Ronnie Lott (5x), LeRoy Butler (4x), and Darren Woodson (4x).
Arrow Shares the Eagles team record for most career interceptions with 34.
Arrow Has 106 career wins, most all-time for any Philadelphia Eagle, including 9 playoff wins.
Arrow Most forced fumbles among NFL defensive backs in history (32 - like sacks, difficult to prove numbers from past players before stat was recorded).
Arrow One of only 9 members of the NFL's 20/20 club - 20 sacks and 20 INTs in a career. Dawkins is one of the 4 defensive backs in the club.
Arrow Ranks 4th in most career sacks by a defensive back with 21.0.
Arrow Holds the Eagles team record for most games played as an Eagle with 183.
Arrow Leads all active defensive players in fumble recoveries with 16 so far in his career.
Arrow He is the only player in league history to record a sack, an INT, FR, and TD reception in a single game (vs. Hou. 9/29/02).



Conclusion:

What makes a Hall of Fame player?

Voters and fans alike have been asking this question since Canton's inaugural year. For some players their inclusion is unquestioned - the all time greats like Reggie White, Jim Brown, and Dan Marino. Yet there are other players that do not have such barrier-defying attention that are great, Hall of Fame players in their own right.

How do you quantify such greatness? I believe the best way to quantify a player's greatness in the ever-changing environment of the National Football League is through an objective comparison with other players in their era as well as a notation of the player's contribution and impact on the game. I believe my quantitative analysis of Brian Dawkins' career has provided ample proof of his uniqueness and singular accomplishments on the field that should merit him induction into the Hall of Fame. And most notably, in my objective analysis I have even dared to omit what possibly could be Brian's most important ticket to Canton - his heart and spirit on the field. As the heart and soul of one of the most consistently dominant defenses of his era, as well as the heart of soul of a legion of fans, Dawkins' impact extended well beyond the field. I sincerely hope that when the time comes, voters will properly respect the career of Brian Dawkins with a bust in Canton for posterity.

Outstanding 2007 interview of Brian Dawkins by Steve Sabol from NFL Films


* I tried my best to be as accurate as possible with all of my statistics, but I am human and god knows I make my mistakes! Pretty much all my information came from the sites listed below, but if I made any errors please let me know!

NFL Per Season League-Wide Interception Totals, 1961-2007


Sources:
http://www.pro-football-reference.com/
http://www.profootballhof.com/
http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com


http://www.footballsfuture.com/phpBB2/posting.php?mode=quote&p=5903432


So glad you put this on here!
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Eagles_808


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Btw, time to officially retire #20 in the Eagles Ring of Honor.
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stevec0008


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Numerous reports on twitter saying the Eagles FO is 100% open to having Dawk come back for one day to retire an Eagle.

If he has a ceremony before a game this year, that may sway me to go to that game.
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RainbowCarebear


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eagles_808 wrote:
Btw, time to officially retire #20 in the Eagles Ring of Honor.


And a 1 day contract.

I'm actually happy that Dawkins retired, he had a seroius neck injury last year, no reason to put his life at risk for one more season.

Dawkins sig or avatars to show respect to one of the greatest in Philadelphia?
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I laughed way too hard at this Laughing they talked about the Dane like Robert Downey Jr talked about The Hulk in The Avengers

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"We have a Dane"
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Kiltman


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the classiest, most friendly men off the field and one of the most insane and intense on it. He was and is a great man, and one heck of a player.....and at the very least a top 5 safety all-time. I'm glad we were lucky enough to have Him as long as we did, it still hurts that money differences got in the way of finishing his career where he was supposed too, and hopefully we do get to sign him to a one day contract.

Hopefully he takes some time to be with his kids and wife, then joins our coaching staff....because I think he would be a great coach.


Thanks B-Dawk for everything, see you in Canton.
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jonu62882


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If he doesn't retire an Eagle, I will be beside myself.
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RainbowCarebear


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thread title in all caps is also wonderful.
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Hammertime52 wrote:
I laughed way too hard at this Laughing they talked about the Dane like Robert Downey Jr talked about The Hulk in The Avengers

"We have the Dallas forum"
"We have a Dane"
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sunnygsm


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My favourite player, guy was so intense on the field and such a class act of it. COME ON HOME BDAWK!
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://blogs.delawareonline.com/eagles/2012/04/23/dawkins-retires/

Quote:
As long as I’m owner, nobody will ever will wear No. 20 again,” said team chairman Jeffrey Lurie, months after Dawkins left the Eagles for the Broncos in free agency before the 2009 season.

Lurie has already said that Dawkins would someday enter the franchise’s “Ring of Honor.” In five years, Dawkins’ name will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot.

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